Questo articolo è stato tradotto, clicca QUI per la versione italiana.

Möbius Dick: The Tragi-Priapic in A Serbian Film
Tragicomic Hybridity

The recognition that both horror and comedy work upon ‘incongruities’ and ‘impurities’1 gives us our starting-point for considering the tragicomic interplay across and within boundaries in the particular case of A Serbian Film (Srpski film, directed by Srđan Spasojević, 2010).2 Alenka Zupančič claims of ‘the genre of tragicomedy’ that it ‘takes place within the tragic paradigm’ and is ‘tragedy’s comedy’, ‘essentially a subgenre, or even a successor, of tragedy’.3 However, the comic element may prove difficult to suppress. In A Serbian Film the two forces are sometimes in a more equal relationship, and this is not always an easy balance – the comic and the tragic vie for dominance, threaten each other, and sometimes heighten each other, as the comic rears its head in the midst of this engineered tragedy of horrors, and refuses to be confined to the periphery. The comic asserts itself as a feature of both the framing narrative, and the film-within-a-film – and in the ‘external’ context of viewing the film, troubles the response. It inhabits, and permeates, the tragic, threatening to scatter it in its resolution. Its very inappropriateness accentuates the impropriety of the situation.

This is particularly striking because A Serbian Film seems to quite precisely and deliberately invoke the classical dramatic model, and the film-within-the-film comes with a script to match – a ‘serious script’ in the words of Vukmir (Sergej Trifunović), the fictional director and master of ceremonies. The constructed scenario drives its protagonist through an escalation of suffering; a revelation of corrupted and terrible familial bonds; a series of unmaskings leading up to the deaths towards the end. The moment of ‘anagnorisis’ (recognition, in Aristotle’s terms)4 culminates in a bed of incest and an act of blinding – suggesting that Oedipus provides one signposted reference-point.

The ‘classical’ model has frequently been associated with a certain purity of distinction, with separate formulae for comedy and tragedy.5 Yet, despite all the ‘tragic’ trappings in A Serbian Film, there is more than a faint hint of the ridiculous in the way events proceed, and this comic element, laughter even (most inappropriate of all), erupts right at the heart of the piece – and in a manner, irrupts into it, as the boundaries are turned inside-out. This aspect is not without a violence, even a cruelty, of its own. The generic hybridity is not permitted to recede into the background (there is very little that remains in the background, either visually or contextually), and its operation is closely related to the manner in which the film insists on returning us to boundaries.6 The artificially ‘pure’ vision peddled by Vukmir is held up as ridiculous, even while it entraps and enmeshes the characters. The re-assertion of artifice in the name of ‘authenticity’ is itself irrepressible, and steals away the promised catharsis of the ending, like pulling a rug out from under our feet.

The film seems to guide our response towards laughter – often following hard upon moments that are difficult to watch (for example, Vukmir’s frenziedly over-dramatic outburst after showing Miloš (Srđan Todorović) his forays into ‘newborn porn’,7 eagerly proclaiming it a ‘new genre’), injecting a singularly inappropriate levity which seems calculated to destabilise our reading, to provoke the viewer’s discomfort rather than provide comic relief.  It also uses recognisably conventional comic elements as ‘signposting’ genre, cueing in the viewer’s receptivity to a comedy-reading,8 such as the particular dynamic established between contrasting characters: Vukmir’s self-proclaimed ‘visionary’ commentary is inflated, and his eloquently rambling, desperate over-enthusiasm provides a counterpoise to Miloš’ solemn and disapproving laconicity – this is the stuff of a comedy double-act: the funny man and the straight man respectively. A frustrated Vukmir urgently berates Miloš for his lack of vision or ambition, while Miloš remains unimpressed and unconvinced – steadfastly deadpan – in the face of the manic rhetorical flourishes which Vukmir earnestly conjures. Such violent oscillations and collisions between interacting and intertwining tragedy and comedy tropes suggest a fragile and threatened boundary: ‘Tragedy deals in extreme emotions […]. And because they are extreme, they are all liable to turn over into laughter’.9 We witness a disorientating veering between and mixing of extremes, which in this film function as part of the relentless gravitation towards excess and attempted transgression associated with the horror genre, and the ‘corporeal transgression’ of contemporary horror in particular.10

Priapus and Oedipus

If Oedipus is a guiding reference point for the ‘plot’ of the film Vukmir is making, the figure towering tall over the scene is a figure of the grotesque – a figure more ‘properly’ associated with a comedy vision than a tragic. This is the figure of Priapus, the minor deity with an impossibly large and constant erection (yet even this comical association isn’t a pure one, but already mingles with the ‘terrible’ and the ‘painful’, as Derrida observes).11 There is, in this inconsistency, substitution of terms, and somewhat inappropriate intermeshing of texts, the suggestion of a parodic dimension, with its associated ‘comic incongruity’.12 This is later rammed home with exaggerated force when Miloš’ enhanced and now drug-fuelled member becomes a blinding instrument turned upon a one-eyed member of Vukmir’s film-crew/gang, in one moment where excessive brutality ushers in the blatantly ridiculous, and Priapus literally stakes his claim to a place right at the heart of Oedipus.

Boasting a grotesquely over-sized penis, with the gargantuanism of Rabelaisian quivering flesh and an appetite to match, aging porn star Miloš is sought after by Vukmir to be the central fulcrum/pivot for his vision. This insatiable member is Miloš’ most outstanding – or upstanding – attribute, around which everything else is organised – the organising principle, or principal, which brings us to questions of the ‘phallus’. While we engage with psychoanalysis at certain points, we will however here take a primarily Derridean approach. The phallus, of course, is not the unenhanced natural penis – but already the ‘simulacrum’, as Derrida reminds us: ‘one should remember […] that the phallus is itself originally a marionette’.13 This is ‘phallic dramaturgy’, to adopt Derrida’s phrase,14 and Derrida’s reading of the Priapic figure in these terms proves enlightening in its declared link to theatrical ‘dramaturgy’, a happy convergence of ideas that makes this approach singularly apt here. A Serbian Film, in its turn, may also be shown to demonstrate and illuminate Derrida’s commentary on the priapic, where Priapus is a figure already riven by paradox at its seemingly pure core.

‘Phallic Dramaturgy’

Miloš’ performance is not so much his, as the performance of potency itself. There are close-ups, re-framings in the porn films he has taken part in, which focus on the penis, with the rest of the body becoming merely a prop, ground, prosthesis in itself – to uphold its performance; not his, so much as its. The performance is indeed a mechanical reflex, a performance upon demand – ‘[the erection] seems to be automatic, independent of will and even of desire’.15 Miloš’ dick also enjoys a certain autonomy – and this autonomy is sometimes linked to the mechanicity of response – a mechanicity that paradoxically occurs at the very point where spontaneity, body, instinct, appetite, and desire override forethought.

This is also reminiscent of parodying in its carnivalesque variant, where a ‘downward movement’ focuses our attention on the ‘bodily lower stratum’.16 Moreover Bakhtin observes how the penis (together with the bowels) ‘belongs to those parts of the grotesque body in which it outgrows its own self, transgressing its own body, in which it conceives a new, second body’.17 The phallic protuberance, in seeming to detach itself, assumes a sovereign role over this same body which is now perceived as secondary. In A Serbian Film, the corporeal itself becomes grotesquely distorted – dominated, led, and foreshortened by the excessively elongated (to a degree where one may suspect caricature) prostheticised penis.

When Miloš admits unease with the way things are going, and has nonetheless managed to sustain an erection during a blowjob (thus performing obediently for the camera), Vukmir comments that ‘at least, your dick enjoyed it; and he never lies’ – a characteristic play on words which seems to suggest at least partial separation along with an incontrovertible embodiment of truth – the dick never stops standing, the dick is unadulterated naked ‘truth’, the dick that will not be denied moreover gives the lie to Miloš’ reluctance.

Miloš, defined as he is by his grand upstanding member, yet begins to make his own demands. Vukmir – like a Master of Ceremonies over a Carnival – wants Miloš, the arbitrarily-crowned King of Carnival, to dance to his tune – like an oversized puppet. Indeed, Ognjanović comments that ‘the body, in this context, is seen mostly as passive, a puppet, easily victimized and manipulated’.18 But Miloš’ performance is more like that ‘marionette theatre’ described by Derrida, which by not merely responding, but asking questions of its own, troubles the assumptions attaching to the behaviour of marionettes – which like ‘beasts, [are] supposed, by our classical thinkers, able only to react rather than respond’.19 However, at this very point where the automaton acquires an apparent autonomy (as something turns to its opposite),20 this is undermined yet again – in a seesaw movement that itself has something of the mechanical about it.

We could also recall here Henri Bergson’s identification of the comic as arising precisely in that (usually sudden) oscillation between mechanical rigidity and the natural: the ‘laughable element […] consist[ing] of a certain mechanical inelasticity, just where one would expect to find the wide-awake adaptability and the living pliableness of a human being’.21 While the sudden oscillation implies a collision between incompatible or clashing elements, the mechanical inelasticity settles like an inadequate and unnatural constraint over the ‘natural’, failing to entirely suppress it.

On the other hand, we could observe here that the ‘inelasticity’ could be found already to inhabit, to haunt, the ‘natural’. Indeed, the marionette phallus/prostheticised penis is somewhere between the mechanical automaton and the beast – boasting both the ‘unnatural’ rigidity of its ‘grandeur’ and ‘natural’ virility – and is therefore already complex and impure, in the very hybridity of its makeup.

The Beast and the Artist – Authenticity and Performance

Vukmir repeatedly refers to Miloš as a beast. He refers to himself as Miloš’ ‘shepherd’, slips bull-viagra into his whisky, and later refers to himself as his ‘monk’, milking Miloš like a productive and horny he-goat for his semen, pushing him to realise his potential in virility – a natural force to be harnessed or unleashed. On the other hand, Vukmir also calls Miloš the ‘proof’ that there is ‘art in pornography’. Miloš is simultaneously evidence of artistry, and virility itself. Already therefore, it is evident that there is something Vukmir seeks which seems to be heightened, beyond mechanical fucking on demand. Miloš, he says, is not like those other porn actors who would ‘be fucking a hole in the wall if there were no pussy’ – rather, Miloš seems to promise in his eyes a kind of refinement in/of the animal – a paradox in itself. Vukmir sees Miloš as exceptional, extraordinary – ‘an artist of fuck’.

In this respect, Vukmir also seeks something ‘authentic’ – the most authentic, physically present instance of direct experience. He locates this in the virility of an untiring member – specifically, Miloš’ untiring member, in a move towards vicariousness through displacement. Vukmir seems to enthrone the porn star’s legendary attribute, investing it with symbolic power, as if it were a totem in a warped cult to fertility – this manoeuvre constructs it as a power-fantasy of pure sovereignty vested in phallocentricity, which is however haunted by a spectre of the ridiculous. Vukmir’s strange assertion, given that he wants to set the stage for something ‘real’, is the intended suppression of chance: ‘Nothing is left to accident’, he says. We see this both challenged, and reinforced, in the course of the film.

The dick that ‘never lies’, according to Vukmir (and we can take this in more than one sense of the word) hides, in itself, a lie. It is of course, a performance – and Miloš initially tries to maintain some separation between his work and his family life (as he tells his wife). The impossible size of his penis (Srđan Todorović’s penis is prosthetically enhanced for the film), the unrealistic proportions of which we always get through a close-up (a filmic ‘lie’), and the duration of the sustained erection (worthy of the mythical Priapus) – stimulated still further by the drugs administered in the film-within-a-film (Vukmir’s film): all these emphatically already set us apart – install distance – from authenticity; or, one might say, they insert a wedge (literally) which intercepts Vukmir’s vision, and which can also slip through that vision (even while being excessively and obscenely visible). In one striking moment, Vukmir frantically announces its (Miloš’) escape – ‘our film jumped through the window!’, conflating star and medium, phallic member and frame. The phallus (here, literally a vanishing-point) nonetheless derives power from being the centring anchor for that vision, the focal point in the frame. It can finally also block vision, by brutally ramming through the instrument of sight – again, quite literally.

The Object and the Gaze

The phallus as object, and particularly object of desire, is of course a paradox, since in a sense it is also called upon to structure everything around it, and introduce difference (if we were to take a psychoanalytic reading). In striving to be also itself the object of desire, it would seek to close that distance – the dream Derrida refers to, of ‘pure auto-affection, in the indistinction of the active and the passive, of a touching and the touched’22 – an observation he returns to when deconstructing the phenomenological approach to subject-object relations.23 In a sense, Miloš is an object in his own eyes, not completely at one with himself – this doesn’t lead to a closing of the gap between object and subject, but rather there is a disjunction, self-distancing, as when he watches himself on screen. With his typical mix of insight and vacuity, and a taste for memorable seemingly-pithy yet empty lines, Vukmir remarks: ‘With great talent comes a great desire for self-fuckability’.

In this radical disjuncture with himself, Miloš’ own centring point seems to have fallen down a chasm – or, to keep within the terms suggested by the film itself, the rabbit-hole of elision – opened up by his inability to identify himself as/with the subject-participant. Miloš’ own activity as viewer seems to position him as his own counterpoint, as he seeks vicarious compensation by watching his own body of work in which he is the main actor. This distancing from himself as actor/agent contributes to a further distancing from his family. In spite of the physical closeness between him and his wife and son, Miloš is more often than not visually ostracised from the family unit, at the periphery: the film is peppered with several domestic shots of him placed on ‘the other side’ of the space shared by his wife and son – Maria and Petar.

However, this self-alienating gap does not render internally-consistent discrete units. Despite Miloš’ resolution to keep the zones between home and work separate, their integrity is constantly threatened. We can see from the outset that there is no clear boundary between domesticity and Miloš’ porn career – his videos are easily accessible in his family space, and the first viewer we see is his wide-eyed child. A little later, his porn videos stimulate his personal sex life, as his wife enquires why he hasn’t fucked her in the same way. His attempt to keep the spheres separate breaks down, as this provides the cue for his private sex life to start imitating his job.

Upon the first meeting with Vukmir, Miloš claims to be ‘tired of cameras and fucking’ – a juxtaposition very readily slipped in, and always foregrounded. However, Miloš’ discomfort, though originating from weariness and boredom, becomes more troubling when the actual shooting of Vukmir’s film commences. The cameras are menacing, with the film-crew behaving in the manner of gangsters, while appearing in the guise of cops. We observe them filming Miloš’ every move but we never get a cutaway shot of what they’re actually shooting which, in cinematic terms, is akin to having a shot with no countershot. The direction of the gaze is therefore one-sided, imposing and secretive – a mystified authority, here explicitly associated with the law24 – and we are not made privy to what’s going on on the ‘other side’ of the lens. In fact, whether the crew are actual cops or actors employed by Vukmir and/or Vukmir’s superiors is a question never answered, but in their intimidating presence – carrying with it the threat of violent enforcement – they are not readily distinguishable from Marko, Miloš’ corrupt cop brother.

There is the suggestion that the thrust towards Miloš’ objectification is for the benefit of the male gaze – as a pillar of prowess to hero-worship or aspire to – a totem to virility; a displaced or projected, artificially-centred, image of the subject. Marko’s gaze turns out to be more important and domineering than is at first apparent, as domesticity itself becomes an object of brutalising desire, and Marko as the peripheral viewer – the desiring gaze – leaps in, with a will to actively participating in that circle, in a fiery precipitation of self-extinction. From the very first shot of Marko looking at Laylah (Miloš’ friend and former acting colleague, who puts him in contact with Vukmir) and Miloš through a window, Marko himself framed by Spasojević’s camera, we are given to understand that nothing is pure, nothing is sacred, nothing is hidden (but this latter may be questioned) – everything is the object to a gaze. Marko doesn’t simply lust after Miloš’ wife and work, but – and on the same level – his family, and apparent domestic bliss itself. Marko’s is the aspirational gaze, defined by its impotent reach towards the desired object.

We could recall ‘love’ in the Freudian sense, as ‘deceptive’ because ‘essentially narcissistic’, seeking to make up for a felt lack.25 Marko’s narcissistic fantasy is limited by the resistance of the desired objects. In a scene with Maria, where Marko’s perspective colours the scene (as indicated by the sensuously lingering close-up on the apple she is biting into, for example), Maria resists his advances and his fantasy.  Frustrated, he goes to the bathroom to masturbate. Tellingly, this scene is intercut not by images of Maria, his ostensible object of desire; instead we alternate between shots of Miloš running in the forest and shots of Marko framed by the mirror, underscoring the fundamentally narcissistic nature of his gaze.

The Frames

Most of the characters are introduced as they pass into some kind of doorway/window/frame. Most shots of windows turn us back to an interior, or yield only a framed and doubling reflection of the character looking out, as if closing in on and entrapping them, doubling back upon the gaze itself. Driving sequences too tend to force our focus onto the driver and passengers, significantly more often than affording us views of the outside. These shots both relentlessly highlight the gaze therefore, and also suggest false boundaries – or boundaries which promise egress, but keep returning us to the point of escape. The explicit and numerous Alice in Wonderland26 references also suggest variations on the same world, here interpenetrating, perhaps unravelling, but always confounding and frustrating.

Almost immediately at the start we see Laylah gift Miloš with a white rabbit soft toy in a black waistcoat, presumably for his son Petar. Besides establishing an immediate connection between Miloš’ harrowing odyssey and his brother Marko, who we see in the same shot dressed in the exact same get-up as the toy rabbit (in matching white and black), this motif recurs over and over throughout the narrative.

When Miloš is picked up for his first meeting with Vukmir, we see a white rabbit effigy dangling from the rearview mirror. This same car is eventually taken by Miloš, who is by now trying to recapture his lost memories and reestablish order (or at least the semblance of one), and there we see the same rabbit-guide, baiting and mocking Miloš who, despite his best efforts, is caught up in a web the complete weave of which is not within his sight and control. He is trapped inside a labyrinthine nightmare that strongly invokes what he has so far held onto as his ‘outside’ world, that is his everyday comings and goings and his seeming domestic bliss, external to his work – so intertwined have these worlds become, that there are several moments in which we are hard-pressed to distinguish between one and the other.  Coupled with the recurring emphasis on boundaries and frames which turn back into or upon themselves, this quality is more than a little reminiscent of that peculiarity of the Möbius strip, that impure boundary folding in upon itself, both outside and inside – as Cormac Gallagher points out, Lacan uses ‘the Moebius strip to question the received psychoanalytic wisdom of distinguishing between the container and the contained’.27 The Derridean paradox is described by Graham Priest in terms of his ‘inclosure schema’28 – which, in Paul Livingston’s reading as hyphenated ‘in-closure’, generates a paradoxical loop ‘that, in being closed., opens to the exterior, and in being open, encloses itself’ – this emphasises its ‘threshold’ nature and ‘spacing’.29

The film’s intense violence is linked to a deconstruction of boundaries (be they political, social or personal) and, conversely, with their systematic regeneration. The chequered floor where Vukmir’s film is set, leading to an unfathomable darkness, is in stark contrast to Vukmir’s effusions about the catalyst that Serbia and its inhabitants need in order to get back on their feet. Despite his rhetoric and hyperbole, Vukmir is reluctant to disclose his vision of the future which, we are made to assume, is congruent to that of an authority or a state who is determined to remain cryptic while pulling the strings, and who, possibly, itself lacks a proper structure – yet dominates regardless (or perhaps because) of its flawed foundational conditions. Even though Miloš’ terrifying journey has been orchestrated by someone, the parameters keep shifting, preventing him (and us) from seeing an overall plan or framework that might impart method and meaning to the pervading madness. The persistently rebounding and unstable  boundaries, as they’re deconstructed and parodically reinstated, bind Miloš (and, by association, the rest of Serbia) to a nightmare out of which he cannot wake up, a nightmare which, ironically (and insidiously), is intent on reinforcing the passive, catatonic state.

Vukmir talks a lot about the regeneration and the renewal of Serbia, however his vision is sterile and barren, albeit saturated with blood and castigating sex. The nuclear family is presented as the principal institution for begetting and socialising children, yet it is introduced only to be undermined (and parodied) on all fronts. The domestic environment is unsafe: children have free and easy access to pornography, parents are distanced from each other, and the uncle (Marko) – not quite comfortingly avuncular or stable, yet a figure of authority in terms of law – cannot be trusted. Moreover, Vukmir chooses to set his film in an orphanage where one of the protagonists, a young girl who is a cross between Alice (in Wonderland) and Lolita, underscores the themes of paternal abandonment, illicit sex and institutional corruption. Sex in A Serbian Film is inextricably intertwined with submission, violence and death.

Once again, we have contrived set-ups and systematic manipulation; a breaking down of boundaries that leads to the build-up of a fiercer yet parodically reproduced setting, like the tightening of a screw. Very revealing is one of the pictures hanging on the wall in Vukmir’s mansion, Baconesque painting featuring someone attempting to exit by climbing a containment barrier, who is nonetheless endlessly re-captured by the painting’s frame. It foreshadows a later scene when Miloš, trapped in a feverish sequence with an old woman and a young girl (Alice/Lolita), jumps out of the window. However his escape is nothing but a leap farther down the rabbit hole, as the structures that are threatened end up re-assembling themselves and incidents are repeated/re-framed in warped or skewed fashion, something conveyed by the frame of the window within the frame of the painting within the frame of the cinema screen.

There is a tendency for frames and images to proliferate in the carnival as Bakhtin describes it: ‘In carnival, parodying was employed very widely […]: various images (for example, carnival pairs of various sorts) parodied one another variously and from various points of view; it was like an entire system of crooked mirrors, elongating, diminishing, distorting in various directions and various degrees’30 – suggesting that the groundedness/earthiness of the relentlessly downward drive does not exclude a sense of disorientation and may, indeed, destabilise binary as well as hierarchical relations. Indeed, this rebounding between adjoining and embedded frames has something of the Bergsonian approach to laughter too: where ‘every moment the whole thing threatens to break down, but manages to get patched up again; it is this diversion that excites laughter’,31 however here the ‘patching up’ does not restore order and stability, so much as supply vertiginous reproductions that are ever-more-askew and bewilderingly paradoxical. It is at this point – which is an elusive point – that the phallus converges with radical absence, where – in Lacanian terms – ‘the subject as annihilated [is] annihilated in the form that is, strictly speaking, the imaged embodiment of the minus-phi [(-ɸ)] of castration’,32 producing the objet petit a (which cannot be seen directly, and only via anamorphosis)33 and generating abime upon/within abime – structured by the instability of the central/de-centred organising point – interlacing and intra-looping frames inadequately and excessively seeking to re-capture and compensate.

Miloš tries to recover his lost memories by breaching the film-viewer paradigm. By going through the recorded footage on a video camera, he assumes the role of a viewer; however this does not give Miloš the upper hand, or a steadier grasp on the unfolding narrative as, at this point, the viewer is unaware of anything beyond that which has already been revealed. Rather, Miloš’ act compromises the audience’s ‘safe space’ by highlighting the viewers’ vulnerabilities as, just like him, they have been jolted into this nightmarish setting and are at the mercy of a director who dictates what needs to be seen at precisely which instant, and in what manner. We are therefore reminded of another party to this orgy of endless fluctuation and/or destruction of boundaries: Spasojević. The director of A Serbian Film is behind Vukmir and the ‘authority’, and we, just like Miloš, are being played for fools. Miloš is trying to figure out what happened to him by aligning his consciousness with that of the viewer – but the latter is just as unprivileged as their point of reference is, ironically, Miloš.

However, even at this point, we are returned to re-focusing on the smaller screen where Miloš is viewing his recorded lost time. As memory seems to coincide with the recording, we are back to full-screen for a phantasmagorical living-room encounter which features an old lady ‘offering’ Alice/Lolita. When Miloš jumps through the window, rather than the camera’s gaze following him out, the escape is followed by instant replay on the screen-within-a-screen. We later get to see the smashed window from the outside, hastily sealed up, preventing us from looking in on the inside.

Moreover, Miloš’ connection with [his] reality begins to unravel more manifestly during the outdoor sequences, when he is first drugged (this marks a turning-point in the plot). Yet, there is something dreamlike, contextually anchorless, about these scenes. Most of them occur as Miloš wanders aimlessly about a town the topography of which is washed with a spectral tint and populated by ‘characters’ from Vukmir’s film but who, even in their humdrum mundaneity, still retain an odd, unsettling aura about them. It is almost like the set-up for a sick joke run amok, orchestrated by Spasojević and which Vukmir, being assigned the role of a trickster, is more than willing to take over and see to its completion, even as his head is being pummelled to a pulp by Miloš. The uncomfortable alliance between Miloš and the viewer, rather than providing asylum or escapism, further reinforces the ease with which boundaries are transgressed and reframed.

Along with the proliferation of frames, and seeming to offer an edgeless alternative and a momentary relief from the tyranny of the frame(s), there are scenes where the edges seem to recede into black, as the screen-space seems to bleed into the viewer’s space (an effect which would be particularly dramatic in a cinematic space, with its darkened auditorium). We first experience this during the filming of Vukmir’s magnum opus, staged inside the aformentioned rooms defined by a seemingly endless chequered floor (another reference to Alice – Through the Looking Glass) and black walls, which melt into the surrounding darkness. However, the ever-extending chequered floor mocks our hopes for an end to the proliferation of borders, as the borders interconnect – both outside and in, both closing and opening the squares. Likewise, as the boundaries between fiction and reality lose definition, another frame comes in to recapture what seems to have escaped, and we’re locked into a seemingly infinite series of mise-en-abimes.

Fluidity is seemingly enabled by those black edges, but context remains undefined. We don’t see much of the wider world, and too often Vukmir is the channel or medium for that (and for commentary on ‘Serbia’), since Miloš is less ambitious, and his world more restricted. The viewer’s reliance on Vukmir’s delusional sweeping commentary and skewed perception presents us with an immediate problem – or rather, presents a problem for immediacy. Vukmir and Miloš’ worlds are far apart (one flamboyantly excessive, and the other mundane), and yet neither seems to offer much connection to wider socio-political context. There seems little to connect them, or to suggest grounds for a relationship, or that they could exist in the same shared world.

Like the film-within-a-film format, the dramatic climax towards the end seems to exceed the contrived form prescribed by Vukmir (‘I’ll provide a fitting end for you’, Vukmir promises Miloš), as Priapus mounts and mounts in uncontrolled unbridled passion and rage, suggesting spontaneity and a ‘beyond’ to performance. However, Vukmir is content to be a casualty to his own ideal. He applauds the act as a resolution, as if all of his expectations have been met and he is now witnessing his dreams bear fruit. He almost weeps with joy, and claims the victory for ‘cinema’: ‘That’s it, Miloš. That’s the cinema. […] That’s film.’ Instability here is a part of the structure, one that could both threaten and reinforce it.

Satire

The disconnection can be disorienting, and perhaps – in a satirical thrust – this could suggest propaganda’s disconnection with its context (with a view however to shaping or re-shaping it after its own image, and to imposing an artificial and illusory stability). The process of fictionalisation and manufacturing of ‘authenticity’ itself is caught up in a tradition of mediated myths, something the film addresses. Some of Vukmir’s commentaries also suggest the reconstruction of a national identity, so there are moments which draw attention to the way myths interact with history – this may recall the practice of nationalist ideology repackaged for the media.34

Vukmir seeks to reconcile his manipulating and engineered vision with his desire to present reality – not an ‘illusion’, but pornography as a ‘live [and direct] transmission of sex’. He struggles of course, yet in another sense he succeeds too well – Miloš’ apparently perfect life, so lusted after by his brother Marko, who remains on the outside of that domestic circle (till the end) cracks at the seams. However, throughout the film there have been clues that the cracks were already in place. While Miloš is ostensibly at the centre of Vukmir’s vision (and Marko’s), we are given the impression that he is at the periphery of his own ‘personal’ family drama – at least till the end, where it is manipulative plot-contrivance that violently thrusts him back into its midst.

The boundaries/frames turn in the fashion of a Möbius strip. This enables us to see this intensively framed and reframed vision as taking a twisting position – a positionality that is as much unstable threshold as standpoint – in relation to the audience’s world, and this enables a satirical connection to be made. A word Hutcheon uses to describe satire when distinguishing it from parody seems particularly apt, when considering frames – satire is ‘extramural in its aim’ (‘social or moral’),35 whereas ‘parody is “intramural”’, with an intertextual target, this being another ‘discursive text’.36 The suggestion is that satire tends to target social conventions and the world ‘outside’ the text – although, as acknowledged by Hutcheon herself, the distinction is more complex than this, with meta-fictional devices possibly operating on both fronts, satire sometimes occurring through parody, etc.37 What is of particular interest to us here is the term ‘extramural’, with its suggestion of walls as boundaries.

As we have shown, there is a parodic dimension at play here, and this lends the satire some of its comedic force. In A Serbian Film, we see an intermeshing of frames. We also see frames recede, we see windows that make the whole vulnerable, by providing a literal hole in the structure – while also enabling vision. We also see windows being treated as mirrors – as if trying to make the gaze the object, while the camera’s gaze remains somewhat oppressive. There is a sense of containment, and a sense of spiralling disorientation as container and contained entwine in their strange grotesquely tragicomic dance. Those who are excluded or set apart are also shown to be hemmed in. However, these viewpoints are also unstable, as they slip in and out of the centre.

The observer’s position is therefore compromised – it is not cleanly detached, nor entirely comfortable in its threshold. This turning inside-out of frames and borders, or recapturing by ever-wider, ever-extending frames (ever-extending has priapic connotations of its own) – as with the ending, which introduces a further frame and another tier of puppet-masters – allows us to see the intermural at work. This interplay would be more aptly described as ‘intermural’, rather than intramural, because what occurs here is interaction between various frames. And yet perhaps this is, rather, precisely where the intramural compromises its purity – where the intramural opens onto the extramural, and where the apparently extramural is implicated: where the borders enfold a ‘principle of contamination’ and ‘impurity’.38 Just as the window- and doorframes are both enclosures and openings, the border between the tragic and comic reveals its instability. The many enfoldings and frames-within-frames afford no full release or relief – as eruption is equally irruption. Alongside this, the series of violent climaxes threaten the frames with the éclats of tragicomic laughter/tears. Phallocentricity is itself compromised, as the figure of the Möbius strip here ‘invaginates’39 – enfolds and hedges, in an opening-enclosing movement – the apparent phallocentricity on a structural level. This offers a self-referentiality that just misses its target, a mode of self-referentiality where the ‘self’ is not co-identical with the self, but rather casts its (and thereby directs our) look slightly askance, thus breeding more frames to entrap and confuse the gaze, which seem to mirror and reproduce the same conditions, but not exactly – giving way to parody and distortion. This aspect is also what allows our view to turn simultaneously to the extramural, giving grounds to a reading that may touch upon wider context – so seemingly detached, yet so effectively and disturbingly extending into and encroaching upon the audience’s space. The particular direction this takes towards satire is something it has not been our intention to fully develop here, but the strategies at work that enable it may be seen to emerge from the forces traced here.

The threshold is the space of interplay, not the total dismantling of boundaries – it seems to be simultaneously a space of entrapment,40 and also a space for potential critique. A Serbian Film illustrates how horror’s excesses can defy tidy self-enclosure (and full self-disclosure), by testing, threatening, and twisting boundaries and playing upon thresholds. The tragicomic hybridity and ambivalence heighten the effect of instability – the horror does not lie merely in the transgression or attempted transgression of boundaries (so often associated with the horror genre),41 but rather – disrespecting binaries – also attaches to the very boundaries, frames and false exits that proliferate excessively: the frames contain, yet let something through, which is re-turned (like the viewer) to yet another boundary, ad absurdum. The frames, flexibly and vertiginously re-forming, folding and re-folding, around the rabbit-hole, are themselves monstrous,42 as power coalesces unstably around the irrepressible spectre/spectacle of the ridiculous; and the mechanisms for control are shown to be themselves excessive in their artifice.

The authors would like to thank: Stefano Caselli, Guillaume Collett, Conrad Aquilina and Kurt Borg.

ENDNOTES

1. Noël Carroll, ‘Horror and Humor’, The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57. 2, Aesthetics and Popular Culture (Spring, 1999), 145-160 (pp. 152, 156).

2. A Serbian Film (Srpski film), directed by Srđan Spasojević (Jinga Films, 2010).

3. Alenka Zupančič, The Odd One In: On Comedy (Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2008), pp. 175-6.

4. Aristotle, On the Art of Poetry (c. 335 BC), trans. T.S. Dorsch, in Classical Literary Criticism (Middlesex: Penguin Books, 1965), pp. 29-75.

5. See Frank Humphrey Ristine, English Tragicomedy: Its Origin and History (New York: Columbia University Press, 1910), p. 2. See, for example, George Steiner’s commentary on The Death of Tragedy (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1980) – he considers Racine to be more rigorously ‘classical’ than the English early modern dramatists.

6. Shaun Kimber (‘Transgressive Edge Play and Srpski Film/A Serbian Film’, Horror Studies 5.1 (2014), 107-125) suggests that modal shifts in A Serbian Film accentuate the aesthetic qualities of the film, to the end of discouraging suspension of disbelief on the part of viewers. This makes it a lot less disagreeable and gruelling to watch.

7. Suggesting an effort, perhaps, to contain and dominate the generative and originary event itself, intercept it at the source?

8. See Eric Weitz, ‘Reading Comedy’, in The Cambridge Introduction to Comedy (Cambridge: University Press, 2009), pp. 20-38.

9. Nicholas Brooke, Horrid Laughter in Jacobean Tragedy (London: Open Books, 1979), p. 3.

10. Xavier Aldana Reyes, Body Gothic: Corporeal Transgression in Contemporary Literature and Horror Film (Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2014), pp. 11-14.

11. Jacques Derrida, The Beast and the Sovereign: The Seminars of Jacques Derrida, Volume 1, trans. by Geoffrey Bennington (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2009), p. 224.

12. Margaret Rose, Parody: Ancient, Modern, and Post-Modern (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), p. 32.

13. Derrida, The Beast and the Sovereign, p. 222.

14. Ibid., p. 223.

15. Derrida, The Beast and the Sovereign, p. 222.

16. Mikhail Bakhtin, Rabelais and His World, trans. by Hélène Iswolsky (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1984a), p. 370.

17. Mikhail Bakhtin in Simon Dentith, Bakhtinian Thought: An Introductory Reader (Routledge: London and New York, 1995), p. 226.

18. Dejan Ognjanović, ‘No Escape from the Body: Bleak Landscapes of Serbian horror film’, Humanistika 1. 1 (2017), 49-66 (p. 65).

19. Derrida, The Beast and the Sovereign, p. 206.

20. See Ibid., p. 221.

21. Henri Bergson, Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic, trans. by Cloudesley Brereton and Fred Rothwell (New York: Macmillan, 1911), p. 10.

22. Jacques Derrida, Archive Fever: A Freudian Impression, trans. by Eric Prenowitz (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1996), p. 98.

23. For example: Jacques Derrida, On Touching – Jean-Luc Nancy, trans. by Christine Irizarry (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2005), p. 180.

24. See Jacques Derrida, ‘Force of Law: The “Mystical Foundation of Authority”’, trans. by Mary Quaintance, Cardozo Law Review, 11 (1990), 919-1046.

25. Cormac Gallagher, ‘Lacan’s Summary of Seminar XI’, The Letter: Irish Journal for Lacanian Psychoanalysis (1995). Retrieved from www.lacaninireland.com/web/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/S-SUMMARY-OF-SEMINAR-XI-Cormac-Gallagher-1.pdf; see Jacques Lacan, The Seminar of Jacques Lacan, Book XI, ed. by Jacques-Alain Miller, trans. by Alan Sheridan (New York and London: W.W. Norton & Company, 1977), pp. 186, 193, 268.

26. Lewis Carroll, The Annotated Alice: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, ed. by Martin Gardner (London: Penguin, 2001).

27. Cormac Gallagher, ‘Lacan’s Summary’.

28. Graham Priest, Beyond the Limits of Thought (Cambridge: University Press, 1995).

29. Paul Livingston, The Politics of Logic: Badiou, Wittgenstein and the Consequences of Formalism (New York and Oxon: Routledge, 2012), p. 126.

30. Mikhail Bakhtin, Problems of Dostoevsky’s Poetics, ed. and trans. by Caryl Emerson (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1984b), p. 127.

31. Bergson, p. 49.

32. Lacan, pp. 88-9.

33. Lacan here approaches anamorphosis through discussion of a distortion in a painting – Holbein’s The Ambassadors. This functions as a ‘trap’ to ‘catch […] the observer’ (p. 92, original emphasis).

34. The film may be read in this way – for example, within the genealogy of Serbian cinema outlined by Špela Zajec, ‘Boosting the image of a nation: the use of history in contemporary Serbian film’, Northern Lights, 7 (2009), 173-189. Mark Featherstone and Beth Johnson read it in the light of this ‘National thing’ constructed by Milosevic’s state, though they see its potential impact as extending beyond this context. Mark Featherstone and Beth Johnson, ‘“Ovo Je Srbija”: The Horror of the National Thing in A Serbian Film’, Journal for Cultural Research, 16.1 (2012), 63-79.

35. Linda Hutcheon, A Theory of Parody: The Teachings of Twentieth-Century Art Forms (New York: Methuen, 1985), p. 62.

36. Ibid., p. 43.

37. Moreover, Hutcheon suggests, parody is one of postmodern’s ‘mechanisms’ for engaging with the conditions of its own production: ‘[W]hat appears to be an aesthetic turning-inward is exactly what reveals the close connections between the social production and reception of art and our ideologically and historically conditioned ways of perceiving and acting’. Linda Hutcheon, ‘The Politics of Postmodernism: Parody and History’, Cultural Critique, 5 (1986-7), 179-207 (p. 184).

38. Jacques Derrida, ‘The Law of Genre’, trans. by Avital Ronell, Critical Inquiry, 7.1 (1980), 55-81 (p. 57).

39. Ibid., p. 70.

40. See Ognjanović.

41. See Andrew Tudor, ‘Why Horror? The Peculiar Pleasures of a Popular Genre’, Cultural Studies, 11. 3 (1997), 443-463, DOI: 10.1080/095023897335691.

42. We can return here to Robin Wood’s influential observation on the horror viewer’s ‘ambivalence extend[ing] to our attitude to [the] normality [that] oppress[es] us’ (Robin Wood, ‘The American nightmare: Horror in the 70s’, in Hollywood from Vietnam to Reagan, and Beyond (NY: Columbia University Press, 2003), pp. 63-84 (p. 72)). Screenwriter Aleksandar Radivojević had indeed identified context – Serbia itself – as the film’s ‘monster’ (in Ognjanović, p. 63). Ognjanović, we think, is right to read into it a comment on neoliberalism’s colonisation of Serbia – however, we would qualify the overwhelming ‘pessimism’ that Ognjanović identifies, by noting that the film manages to deliver a satirical critique through the exposure of the grotesque behind the veneer, which also points to the instability and inconsistency of such structures and mechanisms of power that require mystification, mounting amplification and violent excess for their self-conservation.

 

REFERENCES

Aldana Reyes, Xavier, Body Gothic: Corporeal Transgression in Contemporary Literature and Horror Film. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2014)

Aristotle, On the Art of Poetry (c. 335 BC), trans. T.S. Dorsch, in Classical Literary Criticism (Middlesex: Penguin Books, 1965), pp. 29-75

Bakhtin, Mikhail, Rabelais and His World, trans. Hélène Iswolsky (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1984a)

Bakhtin, Mikhail, Problems of Dostoevsky’s Poetics, ed. and trans. Caryl Emerson (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1984b)

Bergson, Henri, Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic, trans. Cloudesley Brereton and Fred Rothwell (New York: Macmillan, 1911)

Brooke, Nicholas, Horrid Laughter in Jacobean Tragedy (London: Open Books, 1979)

Carroll, Lewis, The Annotated Alice: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, ed. Martin Gardner (London: Penguin, 2001)

Carroll, Noël, ‘Horror and Humor’, The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57. 2, Aesthetics and Popular Culture (Spring, 1999), 145-160

Dentith, Simon, Bakhtinian Thought: An introductory reader (London and New York: Routledge, 1995)

Derrida, Jacques, ‘The Law of Genre’ trans. Avital Ronell, Critical Inquiry, 7.1 (1980), 55-81

Derrida, Jacques, ‘Force of Law: The “Mystical Foundation of Authority”’, trans. Mary Quaintance, Cardozo Law Review, 11 (1990), 919-1046

Derrida, Jacques, Archive Fever: A Freudian Impression, trans. Eric Prenowitz (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996)

Derrida, Jacques, On Touching – Jean-Luc Nancy, trans. Christine Irizarry (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2005)

Derrida, Jacques, The Beast and the Sovereign: The Seminars of Jacques Derrida, Volume 1, trans. Geoffrey Bennington (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2009)

Featherstone, Mark and Beth Johnson, ‘“Ovo Je Srbija”: The Horror of the National Thing in A Serbian Film’, Journal for Cultural Research, 16. 1 (2012), 63-79

Gallagher, Cormac, ‘Lacan’s Summary of Seminar XI’, The Letter: Irish Journal for Lacanian Psychoanalysis (1995) Retrieved from www.lacaninireland.com/web/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/S-SUMMARY-OF-SEMINAR-XI-Cormac-Gallagher-1.pdf

Hutcheon, Linda, A Theory of Parody: The Teachings of Twentieth-Century Art Forms (New York: Methuen, 1985)

Hutcheon, Linda, ‘The Politics of Postmodernism: Parody and History’, Cultural Critique, 5, (1986-7), 179-207

Kimber, Shaun, ‘Transgressive Edge Play and Srpski Film/A Serbian Film’, Horror Studies, 5.1 (2014), 107-125

Lacan, Jacques, The Seminar of Jacques Lacan, Book XI, ed. Jacques-Alain Miller, trans. Alan Sheridan (New York and London: W.W. Norton & Company, 1977)

Livingston, Paul, The Politics of Logic: Badiou, Wittgenstein and the Consequences of Formalism (New York and Oxon: Routledge, 2012)

Ognjanović, Dejan, ‘No Escape from the Body: Bleak Landscapes of Serbian horror film’, Humanistika, 1. 1 (2017), 49-66

Priest, Graham, Beyond the Limits of Thought (Cambridge: University Press, 1995)

Ristine, Frank Humphrey, English Tragicomedy: Its Origin and History (New York: Columbia University Press, 1910)

Rose, Margaret, Parody: Ancient, Modern, and Post-Modern (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)

Spasojević, Srđan, dir., A Serbian Film/Srpski film (Serbia: Jinga Films, 2010)

Steiner, George, The Death of Tragedy (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1980)

Tudor, Andrew, ‘Why Horror? The Peculiar Pleasures of a Popular Genre’, Cultural Studies, 11. 3 (1997), 443-463, DOI: 10.1080/095023897335691

Weitz, Eric, ‘Reading Comedy’, in The Cambridge Introduction to Comedy (Cambridge: University Press, 2009), pp. 20-38

Wood, Robin, ‘The American nightmare: Horror in the 70s’, in Hollywood from Vietnam to Reagan, and Beyond (NY: Columbia University Press, 2003), pp. 63-84

Zajec, Špela, ‘Boosting the image of a nation: the use of history in contemporary Serbian film’, Northern Lights, 7 (2009), 173-189

Zupančič, Alenka, The Odd One In: On Comedy (Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2008)

Questo articolo è stato tradotto, clicca QUI per la versione inglese.

Möbius Dick: A Serbian Film, il tragi-priapico. 
Ibridazione tragicomica

Se è vero che l’horror e la commedia si basano entrambi su ‘incongruenze’ e ‘impurità’,1 A Serbian Film [Srpski film, Srđan Spasojević, 2010] è senz’altro un film tragicomico.2 Secondo Alenka Zupančič, il «genere della tragicommedia […] rientra nel paradigma del tragico» ed è «la commedia della tragedia», «essenzialmente un sottogenere, o addirittura un successore, della tragedia»3 in cui aleggia insopprimibile il comico. In A Serbian Film comico e tragico sono equamente presenti, ma tutt’altro che bilanciati: competono per il dominio, si minacciano a vicenda, a volte si amplificano, col comico che emerge nel bel mezzo della tragedia dell’orrore e rifiutandosi di restarne ai margini. Il comico diventa caratteristica fondamentale di entrambe le cornici narrative presenti in A Serbian Film, ovvero tanto del film in sé quanto del film-nel-film al suo interno. Il comico abita, permea il tragico, minacciando di disperderne gli effetti. È inappropriato, e con la sua inappropriatezza evidenzia come le situazioni rappresentate siano improprie. Da una parte il film rievoca con attenzione il modello drammatico, dall’altra il film-nel-film al suo interno segue un suo copione a sua volta ‘serio’, come lo definisce il regista e cerimoniere Vukmir (Sergej Trifunović). Tutto culmina per i protagonisti in una escalation di sofferenza tale da svelare corruzione e orrore di legami familiari, e passando per una serie di smascheramenti che portano poi alle morti che chiudono il film. Il momento dell’agnizione (del riconoscimento, in termini aristotelici)4 culmina nell’incesto e in un accecamento – un chiaro riferimento a Edipo. È proprio a partire da questa insistenza sul tragico che l’effetto del comico diventa ancora più notabile. Sebbene stando al modello ‘classico’ commedia e tragedia siano chiaramente definibili e distinguibili,5 malgrado tutte le trappole ‘tragiche’ di A Serbian Film, c’è più che un debole accenno di ridicolo nel modo in cui gli eventi vanno avanti. Questo elemento comico, ridanciano addirittura, esplode proprio sul più bello – e in un certo senso irrompe al centro del film, ribaltandone le cornici. In questo non si priva assolutamente di violenza o crudeltà. L’ibridazione di generi non passa mai in secondo piano (e ben poco ci passa, sia a livello narrativo che visivo), ed è a ben vedere strettamente connessa, come vedremo, all’insistenza che il film pone su confini e cornici.6 La visione artistica ‘autentica e pura’ tanto declamata da Vukmir, il regista del film-nel-film, è ridicola anche e proprio quando intrappola e rimescola i personaggi: proprio la riaffermazione dell’artificio in nome dell’autenticità, in un certo senso, fa svanire la catarsi potenziale del finale, quasi togliendoci un tappeto da sotto i piedi. Il film sembra guidare la nostra risposta al comico inserendolo appena dopo momenti difficili da guardare – per esempio, lo sfogo iper drammatico e febbrile di Vukmir dopo aver mostrato a Miloš (Srđan Todorović) le proprie incursioni nel ‘neonato porno’,7 proclamato con entusiasmo come un ‘nuovo genere’. In questo modo, di fatto inietta una leggerezza alquanto inappropriata e che sembra voler destabilizzare la nostra lettura, provocare disagio anziché sollievo comico. Al tempo stesso, il film usa elementi comici convenzionali che suggeriscono al pubblico di trovarsi davanti a una commedia vera e propria,8 per esempio il rapporto conflittuale tra i due protagonisti: l’auto-proclamato ‘visionario’ commentario di Vukmir è esagerato, e il suo sconclusionato e disperato entusiasmo si contrappone alla solenne e laconica contrarietà di Miloš – come in un duo da commedia, composto da un uomo divertente e uno più severo. Vukmir, frustrato, redarguisce Miloš per la sua mancanza di visione o ambizione, mentre Miloš resta poco convinto e tiepido – del tutto impassibile – di fronte ai suoi svolazzi retorici maniacali. Simili oscillazioni e collisioni, anche violente, intrecciano i tropi della commedia e quelli della tragedia e creano così un legame fragile, pronto a sgretolarsi da un momento all’altro: «la tragedia ha a che vedere con emozioni estreme […]. Ed essendo estreme, sono soggette a trasformarsi in risate».9 Diventiamo testimoni di una disorientante mescolanza di estremi, che nel film diventa parte di una implacabile gravitazione verso l’eccesso e di un tentativo di trasgressione del genere horror, e della ‘trasgressione corporale’ dell’horror contemporaneo in particolare.10

Edipo e Priapo

Il film di Vukmir si basa sul mito di Edipo, ma la figura che troneggia davanti alle telecamere è ben diversa di Edipo, più grottesca – volendo più comica che tragica. È la figura di Priapo, una divinità minore contraddistinta da un’erezione costante e sproporzionata (a ben vedere, come nota Derrida, questo elemento non è soltanto comico, ma fa pensare anche al «terribile» e «doloroso»).11 Il confondersi di queste due figure (Edipo e Priapo) e il mescolamento inappropriato di testi di riferimento sembrano suggerire una certa «incongruità comica»12 e suggerire un sottotesto parodistico. Basti pensare a una delle scene più iconiche del film, che vede Miloš accecare un membro della troupe/gang di Vukmir facendo uso del proprio fallo, ormai potenziato e pieno di droga: qui l’eccessiva brutalità sfocia nel ridicolo, e Priapo letteralmente si prende il suo posto contro Edipo.

È in virtù del suo fallo che Miloš, ex porno-attore, viene assoldato da Vukmir. Miloš ha un pene grottesco e sovradimensionato, con un appetito insaziabile, e Vukmir lo vuole protagonista suo film. Il membro insaziabile è l’attributo più eccezionale (o notabile) di Miloš, quindi, e tutto gli ruota attorno – un principio organizzatore, o primario, che ci porta alla questione del ‘fallo’. Per quanto a volte entreremo nel terreno della psicoanalisi, adotteremo un approccio per lo più derridiano. Per ‘fallo’, ovviamente, non si intende un normale pene – ma piuttosto un suo ‘simulacro’, come ricorda Derrida:  «ci si dovrebbe ricordare […] che il fallo è originariamente un fantoccio».13 L’interpretazione di Derrida della figura di Priapo in questi termini è illuminante, e ci sarà utile per analizzare A Serbian Film, proprio perché si collegata esplicitamente alla «drammaturgia» teatrale: l’autore parla infatti di una «drammaturgia fallica».14 A Serbian Film, a sua volta, ci sarà utile come esempio e chiarimento del commentario derridiano sul priapico, e di Priapo come di una figura intimamente paradossale.

«Drammaturgia fallica»

La performance di Miloš non è tanto sua, quanto della potenza in sé. Ci sono close-up, nei film porno cui ha partecipato, che si concentrano sul pene, col resto del corpo che diventa quasi un mero oggetto, una base, una sua protesi – per affermare la sua performance; non quella di Miloš, ma quella del membro. La performance è in se stessa un riflesso meccanico, una causa-effetto – «[l’erezione] sembra essere automatica, indipendente dalla volontà e addirittura dal desiderio».15 Il pene di Miloš gode anche di una certa autonomia, legata a doppio filo all’idea di meccanicità delle sue reazioni: ogni volta entra in azione meccanicamente quando corpo, istinto, appetito e desiderio annullano ogni forma di premeditazione o controllo.Questo ricorda anche la variante carnevalesca della parodia, quando un «movimento discendente» pone la nostra attenzione alla «parte inferiore del corpo».16 Bakhtin nota che il pene «appartiene a quelle parti del corpo grottesco che diventano troppo grandi, trasgredendo il corpo stesso, fino quasi a diventare un nuovo corpo».17 La protuberanza fallica, quasi volendosi staccare, assume un ruolo primario sul corpo stesso, ora percepito come secondario. In A Serbian Film, lo stesso corpo viene grottescamente distorto – dominato, guidato, scorciato dal pene prostetico eccessivamente allungato (quasi caricaturale).Anche quando Miloš non è a suo agio, riesce comunque a sostenere un’erezione durante il sesso orale obbedendo diligente in favore di camera. Vukmir gli dice «per lo meno al tuo cazzo è piaciuto; e lui non mente mai» – una scelta di parole abbastanza peculiare, che sembra suggerire una separazione almeno parziale tra i due corpi, nonché una specie di incarnazione della verità nel fallo – il pene non smette mai di rimanere eretto, come una specie di «verità» genuina e nuda, e non negandosi inoltre smentisce la riluttanza di Miloš. Vukmir – come un maestro cerimoniere di un carnevale – vuole che Miloš, arbitrario re della festa, balli per lui – come una marionetta troppo grande. A ben vedere, Ognjanović commenta che «il corpo, in questo contesto, è visto per lo più come passivo, una marionetta, facilmente vittimizzata e manipolata».18 Ma la performance di Miloš è più come lo «spettacolo delle marionette» di Derrida, che non solo risponde, ma fa domande a sua volta, mette in dubbio il comportamento stesso delle marionette – che, come «bestie, si suppone, stando ai pensatori classici, che sappiano solo reagire e non rispondere».19 Tuttavia, quando l’automazione acquisisce un’autonomia apparente (quasi ribaltandosi),20 ecco che la vediamo minata ancora una volta – in un movimento altalenante che a sua volta ha qualcosa di meccanico, se vogliamo.Henri Bergson, analogamente, vede il comico proprio nell’oscillazione, spesso improvvisa, tra la rigidità di elementi meccanici e innaturali: «l’elemento divertente […] emerge dall’inelasticità meccanica, quando questa si trova dove invece ci si aspetterebbe di trovare la sveglia adattabilità e viva prontezza di un essere umano».21 Mentre l’improvvisa oscillazione implica una collisione tra elementi incompatibili o contrastanti, l’inelasticità meccanica impone un’inadeguata e innaturale limitazione al ‘naturale’, non riuscendo a sopprimerlo interamente.Dall’altra parte, potremmo osservare che l’«inelasticità» può essere già trovata ad abitare, o infestare, il «naturale». E a ben vedere, il pene-fantoccio prostetico sta da qualche parte tra l’automazione meccanica e la bestialità – vantandosi sia della rigidità «innaturale» della sua grandezza sia della «naturale» virilità – ed è quindi già complesso e impuro, ibrido.

La bestia e l’artista – autenticità e performance

Vukmir si riferisce più volte a Miloš come a una bestia. Si definisce a sua volta il “pastore” di Miloš, versa viagra per tori nel suo whisky, quindi parla di lui come di un suo “monaco”, mungendolo come fosse un capro da monta per il suo seme, spingendolo a realizzare il suo potenziale virile – una forza naturale da domare o sprigionare. Al contempo, Vukmir vede in Miloš la “prova” che «la pornografia sia arte». Miloš è al tempo stesso una prova di arte e di virilità. Si rende quindi evidente che Vukmir cerchi qualcosa di più alto al di là del coito meccanico su richiesta. Miloš, dice, non è come gli altri porno-attori che «si scoperebbero un buco nel muro se non ci fosse altro» – al contrario, Miloš sembra incarnare ai suoi occhi una versione raffinata, per quanto animalesca, dell’animalità – una specie di paradosso. Per Vukmir, Miloš è straordinario – «un artista della scopata». A tal proposito, Vukmir cerca anche qualcosa di “autentico” – un’esperienza il più possibile fisica e diretta. La trova nella virilità di un membro che non conosce requie – nello specifico quello di Miloš, e non suo: in un moto di dislocamento e vicarietà. Vukmir incorona il leggendario attributo della pornostar investendolo di un potere simbolico, come fosse il totem di un deforme culto della fertilità – un sogno di potere vestito di fallocentrismo, a ogni modo infestato dallo spettro del ridicolo. La pretesa di Vukmir, nel prepararsi a registrare qualcosa di “reale”, è di sopprimere qualsiasi cosa incontrollabile: «nulla è lasciato al caso» dice. Questa pretesa viene sfidata e alternativamente rafforzata per tutto il corso del film.Il pene che per Vukmir «non mente mai» (e qua possiamo interpretarla in molti modi diversi) è in se stesso falso. È in altre parole una performance – e Miloš inizialmente cerca di mantenere separati lavoro e vita familiare (come dice a sua moglie). Tutto ci distacca da qualsiasi senso di autenticità: l’impossibile dimensione del suo pene, le surreali proporzioni che ogni volta vediamo mediante close-up (una “bugia” filmica), e la durata delle sue erezioni (degna di Priapo stesso) – stimulata comunque dalle droghe del regista – sono tutti elementi che si incuneano (letteralmente) e intercettano la visione di Vukmir, per poi manifestarsi al suo interno (in modo anche eccessivo e oscenamente visibile). In un momento impressionante, Vukmir annuncia febbrile la fuga di Miloš – «il nostro film è scappato dalla finestra!», facendo collassare star e medium, membro fallico e quadro. Il fallo (qui letteralmente un punto di fuga) prende ciononostante potere dall’essere il fulcro della visione, il centro dell’inquadratura. Alla fine, non a caso, può anche bloccare la visione stessa, penetrandola – di nuovo abbastanza letteralmente.

L’oggetto e lo sguardo

Il fallo come oggetto, e in particolare oggetto di desiderio, è a ben vedere un paradosso: se vogliamo vederla in chiave psicanalitica, è infatti proprio il fallo che tendenzialmente struttura il mondo, in quanto oggetto, attorno a sé. Diventando esso stesso l’oggetto del desiderio, sembra chiudere la distanza tra soggetto e oggetto, coronando quello che per Derrida è il sogno «di pura auto-affezione, nell’indistinzione tra attivo e passivo, tra toccante e toccato»,22 – una osservazione cui l’autore torna decostruendo l’approccio fenomenologico classico.23 In un certo senso, Miloš è un oggetto anche per se stesso, e non completamente se stesso – il che non porta a una chiusura del divario tra soggetto e oggetto, piuttosto a una disgiunzione, a un auto-distanziamento, come quando lo vediamo guardarsi su schermo. «Da un grande talento deriva un grande desiderio di auto-scoparsi» dice Vukmir a un certo punto, mescolando come al suo solito intuizioni e parole abbastanza vacue.In questa radicale separazione da sé, Miloš vede il suo stesso punto di centraggio cadere in un chiasmo – o meglio, per usare i termini suggeriti dal film, in una tana di coniglio – aperto dalla sua incapacità di riconoscersi in quanto soggetto-partecipante. Il suo stesso essere uno spettatore sembra farlo diventare il suo stesso contrappunto, di fatto cerca una compensazione vicaria guardando il suo stesso lavoro, con sé stesso come protagonista. Questo distacco da sé in quanto attore/agente contribuisce anche a staccarlo dalla sua famiglia. Anziché avvicinarsi fisicamente a sua moglie o a suo figlio, Miloš è sempre più ostracizzato e posto ai margini, a livello visivo, dell’unità familiare: il film è costellato di momenti in cui lo vediamo messo “dall’altra parte” degli spazi che condivide con i suoi affetti – Maria e Petar.

A ogni modo, questo divario auto-alienante non porta a una separazione di spazi e contesti. Al contrario, malgrado Miloš sia determinato a mantenere lavoro e casa separati, l’integrità di entrambi viene costantemente minacciata. Da fuori, vediamo chiaramente che non ci sono confini definiti a separare l’ambito domestico da quello pornografico – i video del protagonista sono facilmente accessibili nel suo spazio familiare, e il primo spettatore che vediamo è proprio il figlio. Poco dopo, vediamo i suoi video porno stimolare la sua vita sessuale personale, con sua moglie che gli chiede come mai il sesso con lei non sia identico a quello sul set. Il suo tentativo di tenere le due sfere separate è quindi fallimentare, la sua vita sessuale privata inizia a imitare il suo lavoro.Al primo incontro con Vukmir, Miloš si dice «stanco delle telecamere e di scopare», una giustapposizione di concetti abbastanza affascinante. A ogni modo il suo disagio, originato dalla stanchezza e dalla noia, diventa più problematico quando inizia a girare il film di Vukmir. Le telecamere diventano minacciose, con la troupe che sembra composta da gangster vestiti da poliziotti. Li vediamo filmare ogni suo movimento ma non vediamo mai quello che stanno girando, cosa che in termini cinematografici si traduce nell’avere campi ma non controcampi sulle figure che riprendono. Lo sguardo è di conseguenza unidirezionale, impone un segreto. L’autorità, qui associata esplicitamente con la legge (i costumi da poliziotti),24 viene mistificata – e non possiamo sapere quel che succede “dall’altra parte” degli obiettivi. Tra le altre cose, anche la domanda se la troupe sia composta di veri poliziotti o attori pagati da Vukmir o da veri e propri superiori di Vukmir resta senza risposta. Essendo quasi sempre intimidatoria, la troupe non fa che minacciare violenza sugli attori – e in questo il suo atteggiamento non pare affatto distinguibile da quello di Marko, fratello (e non a caso poliziotto corrotto anch’esso) di Miloš.Il film suggerisce che l’oggettificazione di Miloš e del suo membro sia voluta dallo sguardo maschile: come un pilastro di prestanza da venerare o cui aspirare, il membro diventa un totem alla virilità; in altre parole un’immagine su cui il soggetto, lo sguardo maschile, si proietta e aliena, e che centra (nell’inquadratura). Lo sguardo di Marko, non a caso, si svela più importante e dominante di quanto non appaia inizialmente, e per esso l’ambiente domestico diventa in sé oggetto di un desiderio brutalizzante, e Marko in quanto osservatore periferico – sguardo desiderante – salta dentro, con la voglia di partecipare attivamente nel circolo, in una focosa voglia di auto-estinguersi. Dalla primissima inquadratura di Marko che guarda Laylah (amica ed ex-collega di Miloš, che lo mette in contatto con Vukmir) e il fratello da una finestra, a sua volta guardato dalla telecamere di Spasojević, si chiarisce che nulla è puro, nulla è sacro, nulla è nascosto (ma di questo si può discutere) – tutto è oggetto di sguardo. Non solo Marko invidia la vita di Miloš e sua moglie, ma al tempo stesso la sua famiglia, e anche la sua apparente serenità familiare. Marko è lo sguardo che aspira, definito dalla sua ricerca impotente dell’oggetto desiderato.

Potremmo parlare di “amore” in senso freudiano, ingannevole in quanto «essenzialmente narcisistico», in cerca di completamento per un senso di mancanza.25 Gli oggetti del desiderio resistono alla fantasia narcisistica di Marko. In una scena con Maria, definita dalla prospettiva di Marko (lo si nota per esempio dall’insistente close-up su una mela che lei sta mordendo), la donna resiste alle sue avance e al suo desiderio. Frustrato, lui va al bagno a masturbarsi. Significativamente, la scena non alterna alla masturbazione immagini di Maria, l’oggetto del desiderio; piuttosto, vediamo alternarsi la corsa di Miloš nella foresta e inquadrature di Marko nello specchio, che sottolineano la natura fondamentalmente narcisistica del suo sguardo.

Cornici

I personaggi vengono per lo più introdotti passando per porte/finestre/cornici. La maggior parte delle finestre ci fanno vedere gli interni, o riflessi di personaggi che guardano fuori, come se fosse intrappolato, per giunta con lo sguardo sdoppiato. Anche le sequenze di guida tendono a forzare l’attenzione su chi guida e i passeggeri, quasi sempre escludendo ciò che c’è fuori. Queste inquadrature sembrano quindi enfatizzare lo sguardo, e al tempo stesso suggeriscono l’illusorietà di queste soglie – sono soglie che promettono la possibilità di un’uscita per poi farci tornare al punto di partenza. I numerosi ed espliciti riferimenti ad Alice nel paese delle meraviglie26 suggeriscono poi variazioni su questo stesso moto di uscita e ri-ingresso, qui esploso, confuso e frustrante.

Fin da subito vediamo Laylah regalare a Miloš il pupazzo di un coniglio bianco in gilet nero, presumibilmente per il figlio Petar. Oltre che stabilire una connessione immediata tra la straziante odissea di Miloš e di suo fratello Marko, che nella stessa inquadratura è vestito esattamente come il coniglio (bianco e nero), questo motivo diventa ricorrente nel racconto.

Quando Miloš viene preso per il primo incontro con Vukmir, vediamo il simbolo di un coniglio bianco dallo specchietto retrovisore. La stessa macchina viene poi presa da Miloš, quando cerca di recuperare la memoria e ristabilire l’ordine (o almeno una sua parvenza), e qui vediamo la stessa guida-coniglio, mordere e sbeffeggiare Miloš, che malgrado i suoi sforzi è finito in una tela di cui non può scorgere né controllare la tessitura. È intrappolato in un incubo che mescola due mondi che prima cercava di tenere separati – ora diventati così intrecciati che è difficile distinguerli. Insieme all’enfasi ricorrente su confini e cornici, questo crescente mescolamento di campi fa pensare alla struttura del nastro di Möbius, un confine impuro che si avvolge su se stesso, al contempo interno ed esterno. Come nota Cormac Gallagher,27 Lacan utilizza la metafora del nastro di Moebius per mettere in discussione l’assunto psicoanalitico della distinzione tra contenitore e contenuto.  Graham Priest descrive il paradosso di Derrida nei termini del suo “inclosure schema28 – il quale, stando alla lettura di Paul Livingston di “in-closure”, genera un loop paradossale «che, nell’essere chiuso, si apre all’esterno, e nell’essere aperto, si chiude – e questo enfatizza la sua natura di «soglia» e «spaziatura».29Ai vaneggiamenti di Vukmir su ciò di cui la Serbia e il popolo serbo hanno bisogno per rimettersi in piedi si contrappone il pavimento del set cinematografico, a scacchi, circondato dalla più totale oscurità. Malgrado la sua retorica iperbolica, Vukmir è riluttante a rivelare la sua visione del futuro: proprio come lo stato del futuro che immagina, la sua autorità rimane mossa da motivi misteriosi, manca di una struttura portante – eppure riesce a imporsi sugli altri malgrado la manchevolezza di queste fondamenta (o proprio grazie a essa). Il terrificante viaggio di Miloš viene orchestrato da qualcuno, ma i parametri di questa orchestrazione continuano a cambiare, impedendogli (e impedendoci) di vedere un piano complessivo, un metodo, un senso ultimo in tutta questa follia. Il film destituisce di continuo confini: politici, sociali, personali; per poi sistematicamente ricostituirli. E in questa labilità e continua ridondanza di confini Miloš (e, di riflesso, il resto della Serbia) è prigioniero di un incubo da cui non c’è uscita, e che ironicamente (e insidiosamente) non vuole che ridurlo allo stato passivo, anzi catatonico.Al discorso di Vukmir sul rinnovamento della Serbia si legano tutta una serie di rappresentazioni della contemporaneità sociale, politica e culturale del paese. La famiglia è presentata come l’istituzione principale per mettere al mondo e far socializzare i figli, eppure viene introdotta solo per essere minata (e parodizzata) su tutti i fronti. L’ambiente domestico non è sicuro: i bambini hanno libero accesso alla pornografia, i genitori sono distanti l’uno dall’altro e dello zio (Marko) – non certo una figura rassicurante, bensì autoritaria – non ci si può fidare. Oltre a questo, Vukmir sceglie di girare il proprio film in un orfanotrofio dove la protagonista, una giovane ragazza che è un misto tra Alice (di Carroll) e Lolita, parla di abbandono paterno, adulterio e corruzione istituzionale. Il sesso in A Serbian Film è inestricabilmente legato alla sottomissione, alla violenza e alla morte.Ancora una volta, a un primo stato in cui costruzioni artificiose e manipolazioni la fanno da padrone segue la distruzione, e poi di nuovo una re-istituzione di un contesto più feroce di quello iniziale, al tempo stesso più parodistico, come una vite che si stringe. Illuminante è il quadro attaccato al muro nella casa di Vukmir, un dipinto baconiano di una figura che scavalca una barriera, a sua volta inevitabilmente all’interno dei limiti della cornice del quadro. Anticipa un momento del film successivo in cui Miloš, intrappolato in una convulsa scena con una vecchia donna e la giovane Alice/Lolita, salta a sua volta fuori da una finestra. La fuga però non è che un ulteriore affondare nella tana del coniglio, poiché le strutture minacciate finiscono per riassemblarsi e gli orrori si ripetono e ricontestualizzano, cosa in qualche modo già anticipata dalla struttura a scatole cinesi di cornici del quadro: la cornice della finestra dentro quella del quadro dentro quella dello schermo cinematografico.

Anche nel carnevale, come nota Bakhtin, proliferano le cornici: «nel carnevale, la parodia è ampiamente diffusa […]: varie immagini (per esempio, coppie carnevalesche di vario tipo) parodizzano altre in vario modo e da vari punti di vista; è come un intero sistema di specchi distorti, allungati, ristretti, spanciati in varie direzioni e in gradi diversi».30 Questo susseguirsi di parodie, e parodie di parodie, porta a un senso di disorientamento che non fa che destabilizzare gerarchie o distinzioni. Se per Bergson il comico emerge dall’oscillazione in cui «ogni momento tutto minaccia di sgretolarsi, ma riesce a rimettersi insieme»,31 qui il rimettersi insieme non ricostruisce ordine e stabilità, piuttosto fornisce ricostruzioni vertiginose anche più storte e paradossali delle precedenti. […]Miloš cerca di recuperare la memoria perduta violando il paradigma film-spettatore. Assume il ruolo di spettatore, ma ciò non lo avvicina affatto alla verità: neanche lo spettatore sa nulla al di là di ciò che gli è stato rivelato. L’’atto di Miloš compromette lo «spazio sicuro» del pubblico evidenziando le vulnerabilità degli spettatori, che proprio come lui sono scaraventati in uno scenario da incubo e alla mercé di un regista che decide cosa debba essere visto, in quale momento, e in che modo. Il che ci porta a un altro fulcro di questa orgia di fluttuazioni senza fine e/o distruzione dei confini: Spasojević. Dietro Vukmir e “l’autorità” c’è proprio il regista di A Serbian Film, e noi, proprio come Miloš, veniamo presi in giro. Miloš sta cercando di capire cosa gli sia successo, allineando la sua coscienza con quella dello spettatore, ma quest’ultimo è altrettanto privo di linee guida, in quanto il suo punto di riferimento è, ironicamente, proprio il protagonista del film.

Tuttavia, anche a questo punto, torniamo a concentrarci nuovamente sullo schermo più piccolo dove Miloš sta guardando registrato. Poiché la memoria sembra coincidere con la registrazione, torniamo a schermo intero per un fantasmagorico incontro in soggiorno con una vecchia signora che “offre” Alice/Lolita. Dopo che Miloš salta attraverso la finestra, invece di vederlo scappare vediamo un replay istantaneo sullo schermo nello schermo. In seguito riusciamo a vedere la finestra rotta dall’esterno, sigillata frettolosamente, che ci impedisce di guardare dentro.Inoltre, il legame di Miloš con la [sua] realtà inizia a farsi più chiaro durante le sequenze all’aperto, quando viene drogato per la prima volta (fatto che segna una svolta nella trama). Eppure, c’è qualcosa di onirico in queste scene. La maggior parte di queste vede Miloš vagare senza meta per una città la cui topografia è bagnata da una tinta spettrale e popolata da “personaggi” del film di Vukmir ma che, per quanto sembrino persone comuni, hanno  un’aura strana e inquietante. È quasi come la messa in scena di uno scherzo folle orchestrato da Spasojević, e che Vukmir, essendogli stato assegnato il ruolo di un imbroglione, è più che disposto a far suo pur di vederne il completamento, e per quanto la sua testa venga ridotta in poltiglia dai pugni di Miloš. La scomoda alleanza tra Miloš e lo spettatore, piuttosto che fornire asilo o evasione, rafforza ulteriormente la facilità con cui i confini vengono trasgrediti e riformulati.Insieme alla proliferazione di cornici, e offrendo apparentemente un’alternativa priva di limitazioni e una momentanea evasione dalla tirannia della cornice, ci sono anche scene in cui i bordi sembrano venire assorbiti nel nero, mentre lo spazio dello schermo sembra strabordare nello spazio dello spettatore (un effetto particolarmente evidente nello spazio cinematografico, con il pubblico che sta nell’oscurità). Lo vediamo per la prima volta durante le riprese del magnum opus di Vukmir, allestito in stanze con il pavimento a scacchi senza fine menzionate in precedenza (un altro riferimento ad AliceAttraverso lo specchio) e pareti nere, che si fondono nell’oscurità circostante. Tuttavia, il pavimento a scacchiera si estende all’infinito e deride così le nostre speranze per la fine della proliferazione dei confini, poiché i confini si interconnettono – sia all’esterno che all’interno, chiudendo e aprendo la scacchiera del pavimento. Allo stesso modo, mentre i confini tra finzione e realtà perdono definizione, un altro fotogramma entra per riprendere ciò che sembra essere sfuggito, e siamo bloccati in una serie apparentemente infinita di mise-en-abime.

La fluidità è apparentemente consentita da quei bordi neri, ma il contesto rimane indefinito. Non vediamo molto del resto del mondo, e troppo spesso Vukmir fa da canale o mediatore (nonché da commentatore sulla Serbia), dal momento che Miloš è meno ambizioso e il suo mondo più ristretto. La dipendenza dello spettatore dal commento delirante di Vukmir e dalla sua percezione distorta ci presenta un problema immediato – o meglio, presenta un problema per l’immediatezza. I mondi di Vukmir e Miloš sono molto distanti (uno vistosamente eccessivo, l’altro banale), eppure nessuno dei due sembra offrire molte connessioni con un più ampio contesto socio-politico. C’è poco a collegarli, o a suggerire basi su cui possano relazionarsi, o addirittura che appartengano a uno stesso mondo condiviso.

Come il formato del film-nel-film, il climax drammatico verso la fine sembra superare la forma artificiosa prescritta da Vukmir («Ti darò una fine degna», promette a Miloš), e vede Priapo montare di rabbia e furore incontrollabili, quasi suggerendo qualcosa di ulteriore alla performance, di spontaneo. Tuttavia, scopriamo Vukmir contento di essere una vittima del suo stesso ideale. Applaude l’atto come una risoluzione, come se tutte le sue aspettative fossero state soddisfatte e ora stesse assistendo ai suoi sogni che finalmente danno i loro frutti. Quasi piange di gioia e declama la vittoria del “cinema”: «Ecco, Miloš. Questo è il cinema. […] Questo è un film». L’instabilità qui è una parte della struttura, e potrebbe sia minacciarla che rafforzarla.

Satira

In chiave satirica, questa disorientante reazione finale ricorda la disconnessione della propaganda dal suo contesto (che plasma e rimodella a sua immagine, imponendogli una stabilità artificiale e illusoria – proprio come va Vukmir davanti al massacro). A ben vedere il film parla anche di questo, di imposizione e produzione di una verità mediata. Alcuni dei commenti di Vukmir tirano infatti in ballo la ricostruzione di una identità nazionale, trattando quindi del modo in cui i miti propagandistici interagiscono con la storia – che ricorda come l’ideologia nazionalista riconfezioni la realtà attraverso i media.32

Vukmir cerca di conciliare la sua visione manipolatrice e ingegnerizzata con il suo desiderio di presentare la realtà – la pornografia non come “illusione”, ma come una «trasmissione viva [e diretta] del sesso». Fa fatica, ovviamente, ma in un certo senso ci riesce anche troppo bene: la vita apparentemente perfetta di Miloš, tanto bramata da suo fratello Marko, infine va realmente in pezzi. A ben vedere, per tutto il film abbiamo avuto modo di vedere queste crepe prima che il tutto si frantumi. Come abbiamo visto, mentre Miloš è apparentemente al centro della visione di Vukmir (e di Marko), ci viene data l’impressione che si trovi invece alla periferia del suo stesso dramma familiare “personale” – almeno fino alla fine, dove è un espediente manipolativo della trama a ricacciarcelo con violenza in mezzo.

Le cornici del film, e con esse i confini ideologici e concettuali su cui si basa, girano alla maniera di un nastro di Möbius. In questo senso si ritorcono – sia come posizione e significato che come punto di vista – verso il pubblico, fatto che ne svela una dimensione satirica. Nel distinguere la satira dalla parodia, Hutcheon dà delle definizioni particolarmente appropriate al nostro caso: scrive che la satira è «extramurale nel suo scopo» («sociale o morale»),33 mentre «la parodia è “intramurale”», un ‘testo discorsivo’ con obbiettivi intertestuali.34 In altre parole, la satira tende a prendere di mira le convenzioni sociali e il mondo “fuori” dal testo – sebbene, come riconosciuto dalla stessa Hutcheon, la distinzione sia più complessa di così, con dispositivi meta-narrativi che possono operare su entrambi i fronti, come nel caso della parodia, ecc.35 Ciò che qui ci interessa particolarmente è il termine ‘extramurale’, e l’enfasi che viene posta sul ‘muro’ come ‘confine’.

Come abbiamo detto, c’è una dimensione parodistica in ballo che, qui, dà alla satira parte della sua forza comica. In A Serbian Film, vediamo confini di continuo. Vediamo confini e muri che si allontanano e finestre che rendono il tutto vulnerabile, bucando letteralmente le pareti – e al tempo stesso rendendo possibile la visione al loro interno. Vediamo anche finestre trattate come specchi – come se lo sguardo su di loro diventasse esso stesso l’oggetto dello sguardo della macchina da presa, sempre opprimente. C’è un senso di confinamento, e viene a crearsi una una strana danza tragicomica e grottesca che, nel momento in cui esclude qualcuno dal confinamento, subito dopo lo riassorbe. Ci si avvicina e allontana continuamente da questa spirale.

La posizione dell’osservatore è quindi compromessa – non è chiaramente riconoscibile, né comoda. Questo continuo oscillare dentro-fuori di cornici e confini, o estendersi di cornici (tra l’altro questa estensione continua è in se stessa priapica, se vogliamo) – come nel finale, in cui viene introdotta una cornice ulteriore e un altro gruppo di marionettisti – ci consente di vedere l’intramurale all’opera. Sarebbe giusto descrivere questo scambio come “intermurale”, più che intramurale, in quanto di fatto quel che avviene è un’interazione tra più cornici. E questo è forse prescisamente dove l’intramurale compromette la sua purezza – dove si apre all’extramurale, e dove l’apparentemente extramurale viene chiamato in causa: dove i confinini svelano un «principio di contaminazione» e «impurità».36 Proprio come la finestra e le cornici delle porte sono al tempo stesso aperture e chiusure, i confini tra il tragico e il comico si svelano instabili. I vari svelamenti e le varie cornici-dentro-le-cornici non si chiudono mai – eruzione e irruzione diventano uguali. Assieme a questo, la serie di violenti climax minaccia le cornici con i frammenti di risa/pianti tragicomici. Il fallocentrismo stesso viene compromesso, la figura del nastro di Möbius “invagina”37 – avvolge e copre in un movimento di apertura-chiusura – l’apparente fallocentrismo. Questo offre un’autoreferenzialità che semplicemente manca il suo obiettivo, una modalità di autoreferenzialità in cui il “sé” non è co-identico al sé, ma piuttosto getta il suo (e quindi dirige il nostro) sguardo leggermente di traverso, generando così più cornici che intrappolano e confondono, che sembrano riprodursi e specchiarsi all’infinito, ma in modo tutt’altro che esatto, lasciando il posto alla parodia e alla distorsione. Questo aspetto è anche ciò che consente al nostro sguardo di rivolgersi contemporaneamente all’extramurale, avvalorando una lettura politica dell’opera – che appare sì distaccata dalla realtà, ma all’improvviso invade lo spazio del pubblico. 

La soglia diventa allora spazio di interazione di confini, non di loro superamento: al tempo stesso intrappola38 e critica, mette in dubbio. A Serbian Film illustra come gli eccessi dell’horror possano sfidare la chiusura dei confini, mettendo alla prova, minacciando e distorcendoli, giocando sulle soglie. L’ibridismo tragicomico e l’ambivalenza accrescono l’effetto dell’instabilità: l’orrore non risiede solo nella trasgressione o nel tentativo di trasgressione dei confini (così spesso associati al genere horror),39 ma piuttosto vi si attacca anche, così come fa uso di cornici e false uscite che proliferano a dismisura: le inquadrature confinano, ma lasciano passare qualcosa, che viene restituito poi (come lo spettatore) a un altro confine, ad absurdum. Le cornici, che si riformano flessibili e vertiginose, si piegano e si ripiegano intorno alla tana del coniglio, e sono esse stesse mostruose.40 I meccanismi di controllo sono essi stessi irrefrenabili ed eccessivi.

Gli autori ringraziano: Stefano Caselli, Guillaume Collett, Conrad Aquilina and Kurt Borg.

NOTE

1. Noël Carroll, ‘Horror and Humor’, The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57. 2, Aesthetics and Popular Culture (Spring, 1999), 145-160 (pp. 152, 156).

2. A Serbian Film (Srpski film), directed by Srđan Spasojević (Jinga Films, 2010).

3. Alenka Zupančič, The Odd One In: On Comedy (Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2008), pp. 175-6.

4. Aristotle, On the Art of Poetry (c. 335 BC), trans. T.S. Dorsch, in Classical Literary Criticism (Middlesex: Penguin Books, 1965), pp. 29-75.

5. Cfr. Frank Humphrey Ristine, English Tragicomedy: Its Origin and History (New York: Columbia University Press, 1910), p. 2. Cfr., per esempio, George Steiner su The Death of Tragedy (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1980) – che considera Racine più rigorosamente “classico” rispetto ai drammaturghi inglesi moderni.

6. Shaun Kimber (‘Transgressive Edge Play and Srpski Film/A Serbian Film’, Horror Studies 5.1 (2014), 107-125) suggerisce che queste mutazioni modali di A Serbian Film ne accentuino le qualità estetiche, al fine di scoraggiare la sospensione dell’incredulità in chi guarda. Questo rende il film molto meno disgustoso ed estenuante. 

7. Forse volendo contenere e dominare l’evento originario in sé, intercettandolo alla radice?

8. Cfr. Eric Weitz, ‘Reading Comedy’, in The Cambridge Introduction to Comedy (Cambridge: University Press, 2009), pp. 20-38.

9. Nicholas Brooke, Horrid Laughter in Jacobean Tragedy (London: Open Books, 1979), p. 3.

10. Xavier Aldana Reyes, Body Gothic: Corporeal Transgression in Contemporary Literature and Horror Film (Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2014), pp. 11-14.

11. Jacques Derrida, The Beast and the Sovereign: The Seminars of Jacques Derrida, Volume 1, trans. by Geoffrey Bennington (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2009), p. 224.

12. Margaret Rose, Parody: Ancient, Modern, and Post-Modern (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), p. 32.

13. Derrida, The Beast and the Sovereign, p. 222.

14. Ibid., p. 223.

15. Derrida, The Beast and the Sovereign, p. 222.

16. Mikhail Bakhtin, Rabelais and His World, trans. by Hélène Iswolsky (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1984a), p. 370.

17. Mikhail Bakhtin in Simon Dentith, Bakhtinian Thought: An Introductory Reader (Routledge: London and New York, 1995), p. 226.

18. Dejan Ognjanović, ‘No Escape from the Body: Bleak Landscapes of Serbian horror film’, Humanistika 1. 1 (2017), 49-66 (p. 65).

19. Derrida, The Beast and the Sovereign, p. 206.

20. Cfr. Ibid., p. 221.

21. Henri Bergson, Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic, trans. by Cloudesley Brereton and Fred Rothwell (New York: Macmillan, 1911), p. 10.

22. Jacques Derrida, Archive Fever: A Freudian Impression, trans. by Eric Prenowitz (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1996), p. 98.

23. Per esempio: Jacques Derrida, On Touching – Jean-Luc Nancy, trans. by Christine Irizarry (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2005), p. 180.

24. Cfr. Jacques Derrida, ‘Force of Law: The “Mystical Foundation of Authority”’, trad. Mary Quaintance, Cardozo Law Review, 11 (1990), 919-1046.

25. Cormac Gallagher, ‘Lacan’s Summary of Seminar XI’, The Letter: Irish Journal for Lacanian Psychoanalysis (1995). www.lacaninireland.com/web/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/S-SUMMARY-OF-SEMINAR-XI-Cormac-Gallagher-1.pdf; see Jacques Lacan, The Seminar of Jacques Lacan, Book XI, ed. by Jacques-Alain Miller, trad. Alan Sheridan (New York and London: W.W. Norton & Company, 1977), pp. 186, 193, 268.

26. Lewis Carroll, The Annotated Alice: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, ed. Martin Gardner (London: Penguin, 2001).

27. Cormac Gallagher, ‘Lacan’s Summary’.

28. Graham Priest, Beyond the Limits of Thought (Cambridge: University Press, 1995).

29. Paul Livingston, The Politics of Logic: Badiou, Wittgenstein and the Consequences of Formalism (New York and Oxon: Routledge, 2012), p. 126.

30. Mikhail Bakhtin, Problems of Dostoevsky’s Poetics, ed. and trans. by Caryl Emerson (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1984b), p. 127.

31. Bergson, p. 49.

32. Il film può essere interpretato così –  vedi per esempio Špela Zajec, ‘Boosting the image of a nation: the use of history in contemporary Serbian film’, Northern Lights, 7 (2009), 173-189. Cfr. anche l’interpretazione di Mark Featherstone e Beth Johnson, in Mark Featherstone and Beth Johnson, ‘“Ovo Je Srbija”: The Horror of the National Thing in A Serbian Film’, Journal for Cultural Research, 16.1 (2012), 63-79.

33. Linda Hutcheon, A Theory of Parody: The Teachings of Twentieth-Century Art Forms (New York: Methuen, 1985), p. 62.

34. Ibid., p. 43.

35. Hutcheon scrive che la parodia è uno dei meccanismi che il postmoderno usa per parlare delle sue stesse condizioni produttive: ‘[W]hat appears to be an aesthetic turning-inward is exactly what reveals the close connections between the social production and reception of art and our ideologically and historically conditioned ways of perceiving and acting’. Linda Hutcheon, ‘The Politics of Postmodernism: Parody and History’, Cultural Critique, 5 (1986-7), 179-207 (p. 184).

36. Jacques Derrida, ‘The Law of Genre’, trans. by Avital Ronell, Critical Inquiry, 7.1 (1980), 55-81 (p. 57).

37. Ibid., p. 70.

38. See Ognjanović.

39. Vedi Andrew Tudor, ‘Why Horror? The Peculiar Pleasures of a Popular Genre’, Cultural Studies, 11. 3 (1997), 443-463, DOI: 10.1080/095023897335691.

40 Vedi anche Robin Wood, ‘The American nightmare: Horror in the 70s’, in Hollywood from Vietnam to Reagan, and Beyond (NY: Columbia University Press, 2003), pp. 63-84 (p. 72), a proposito dello spettatore del film horror. Lo sceneggiatore Aleksandar Radivojević vede in effetti nel contesto del film – la Serbia – il vero ‘mostro’ (in Ognjanović, p. 63).

Opere citate

Aldana Reyes, Xavier, Body Gothic: Corporeal Transgression in Contemporary Literature and Horror Film. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2014)

Aristotle, On the Art of Poetry (c. 335 BC), trans. T.S. Dorsch, in Classical Literary Criticism (Middlesex: Penguin Books, 1965), pp. 29-75

Bakhtin, Mikhail, Rabelais and His World, trans. Hélène Iswolsky (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1984a)

Bakhtin, Mikhail, Problems of Dostoevsky’s Poetics, ed. and trans. Caryl Emerson (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1984b)

Bergson, Henri, Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic, trans. Cloudesley Brereton and Fred Rothwell (New York: Macmillan, 1911)

Brooke, Nicholas, Horrid Laughter in Jacobean Tragedy (London: Open Books, 1979)

Carroll, Lewis, The Annotated Alice: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, ed. Martin Gardner (London: Penguin, 2001)

Carroll, Noël, ‘Horror and Humor’, The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57. 2, Aesthetics and Popular Culture (Spring, 1999), 145-160

Dentith, Simon, Bakhtinian Thought: An introductory reader (London and New York: Routledge, 1995)

Derrida, Jacques, ‘The Law of Genre’ trans. Avital Ronell, Critical Inquiry, 7.1 (1980), 55-81

Derrida, Jacques, ‘Force of Law: The “Mystical Foundation of Authority”’, trans. Mary Quaintance, Cardozo Law Review, 11 (1990), 919-1046

Derrida, Jacques, Archive Fever: A Freudian Impression, trans. Eric Prenowitz (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996)

Derrida, Jacques, On Touching – Jean-Luc Nancy, trans. Christine Irizarry (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2005)

Derrida, Jacques, The Beast and the Sovereign: The Seminars of Jacques Derrida, Volume 1, trans. Geoffrey Bennington (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2009)

Featherstone, Mark and Beth Johnson, ‘“Ovo Je Srbija”: The Horror of the National Thing in A Serbian Film’, Journal for Cultural Research, 16. 1 (2012), 63-79

Gallagher, Cormac, ‘Lacan’s Summary of Seminar XI’, The Letter: Irish Journal for Lacanian Psychoanalysis (1995) Retrieved from www.lacaninireland.com/web/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/S-SUMMARY-OF-SEMINAR-XI-Cormac-Gallagher-1.pdf

Hutcheon, Linda, A Theory of Parody: The Teachings of Twentieth-Century Art Forms (New York: Methuen, 1985)

Hutcheon, Linda, ‘The Politics of Postmodernism: Parody and History’, Cultural Critique, 5, (1986-7), 179-207

Kimber, Shaun, ‘Transgressive Edge Play and Srpski Film/A Serbian Film’, Horror Studies, 5.1 (2014), 107-125

Lacan, Jacques, The Seminar of Jacques Lacan, Book XI, ed. Jacques-Alain Miller, trans. Alan Sheridan (New York and London: W.W. Norton & Company, 1977)

Livingston, Paul, The Politics of Logic: Badiou, Wittgenstein and the Consequences of Formalism (New York and Oxon: Routledge, 2012)

Ognjanović, Dejan, ‘No Escape from the Body: Bleak Landscapes of Serbian horror film’, Humanistika, 1. 1 (2017), 49-66

Priest, Graham, Beyond the Limits of Thought (Cambridge: University Press, 1995)

Ristine, Frank Humphrey, English Tragicomedy: Its Origin and History (New York: Columbia University Press, 1910)

Rose, Margaret, Parody: Ancient, Modern, and Post-Modern (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993)

Spasojević, Srđan, dir., A Serbian Film/Srpski film (Serbia: Jinga Films, 2010)

Steiner, George, The Death of Tragedy (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1980)

Tudor, Andrew, ‘Why Horror? The Peculiar Pleasures of a Popular Genre’, Cultural Studies, 11. 3 (1997), 443-463, DOI: 10.1080/095023897335691

Weitz, Eric, ‘Reading Comedy’, in The Cambridge Introduction to Comedy (Cambridge: University Press, 2009), pp. 20-38

Wood, Robin, ‘The American nightmare: Horror in the 70s’, in Hollywood from Vietnam to Reagan, and Beyond (NY: Columbia University Press, 2003), pp. 63-84

Zajec, Špela, ‘Boosting the image of a nation: the use of history in contemporary Serbian film’, Northern Lights, 7 (2009), 173-189

Zupančič, Alenka, The Odd One In: On Comedy (Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2008)