L’articolo è stato tradotto in italiano: cliccare QUI per la versione in ITALIANO.

One of the most prolific arthouse directors today, Filipino filmmaker Lav Diaz is primarily known for his films’ extensive lengths, their distinct black-and-white, and the two-fold film themes, which use images of a suffering individual as a metaphor for wider social ills, both in the Philippines and in the world. After his grand success at this year’s Berlinale, where he won the Silver Bear Alfred Bauer Prize, and with the looming presidential election in the Philippines – politics the director is always engaged with throughout his films – it seems appropriate to revisit Diaz’s career spanning almost two decades.
Lav Diaz was born on 30 December 1958 in what is today Datu Paglas on the island of Mindanao. With a group of other newly graduated teachers, his parents moved with their children from urban Manila to the rural areas of Mindanao after having volunteered to set up a school system in the poor region. Even though the 50s and 60s were characterised by violent clashes between Christians and Muslims in the area, Diaz and his family were never directly effected by this. On the contrary, Diaz describes this period as “blissful and harmonious” despite the stark poverty (Diaz, 2015). It was there and then that Diaz had been exposed to a range of films from all over the world, from Kung Fu to Spaghetti Western to Filipino melodrama. His father was a film addict, as he says, who used to take his children to Tucarang every weekend for four double bills. Years later, in his first year in college, Diaz saw Lino Brocka’s Maynila, sa mea Kuko ng Liwanag [1975], which was to change his life. When I asked him about the meaning of this film in the broader perspective of his career as director he told me that while watching the film he «started to notice what was happening in my country. I was already 17. So when I saw this film, I thought ‘My God, this medium is so powerful. We can use this to educate our people.» (Diaz, 2015)

diaz - 1Maynila, sa mea Kuko ng Liwanag.

It was the beginning of Diaz’s filmmaking career. Diaz worked for a few years for the Filipino film studio Regal, making primarily commercial films with a slightly artistic touch. At the time, like so many others like him, he felt he needed to be part of the system in order to realise his dream of becoming a filmmaker. His early film Naked under the Moon [Hubad sa Ilalim ng Buwan, 1999], for example, shows Diaz’s preference of long-takes and long shots over commercial fast cuts and close-ups. Yet the studio behind it decided the film needed juicy sex scenes to attract more viewers and increase profit at the box office. He left the commercial filmmaking scene four years after he had started. In the early 2000s, Diaz started to follow the artistic veins which had already been visible in Naked under the Moon.

diaz - 2Naked under the moon.

This new, and now contemporary, period started with the production of Batang West Side [West Side Avenue, 2001], which was the longest Filipino film at the time (Vera, 2014). Since then, Diaz’s films have become visually more and more recognisable. With the exception of Batang, his 2002 film Hesus, The Revolutionary [Hesus, Rebolusyunaryo], and his Cannes Film Festival submission Norte, The End of History [Norte, Hangganan ng Kasaysayan, 2013], all of Diaz’s later films are marked by a grayscale or stark black-and-white aesthetic. The latter is particularly intense in Diaz’s six-hour film Florentina Hubaldo, CTE [id., 2012], which, at times, looks similar to Béla Tarr’s noir The Man from London [A londoni férfi, 2007]. He describes colour as «very, very deceptive. … I want to do black-and-white to do justice to what the film is representing. Like poverty – it’s better in black-and-white. Suffering is better in black-and-white. And beyond poverty and suffering, for me, cinema is black-and-white» (Diaz, 2014). Apart from his obsession with black-and-white, about which he is very open and clear, Diaz’s films stand out because of their heavy use of a static camera and long-shots, which show vast, open natural spaces in which his characters are often merely dots. He considers nature an actor, and thus grants it as much on-screen space as all his other actors and actresses.

diaz - 3

diaz - 4Up, Batang West Side; down, Florentina Hubaldo, CTE

What stands out in Diaz’s entire oeuvre, though, is his absolute focus on duration. Films of six or seven hour running time are not rare. In fact, they are the norm, and anything shorter is a surprising exception. The films’ lengths represent a cinematic version of a pre-Hispanic Malay past when time in the Philippines was considered as spatial. «Space is still the dominant philosophy [today], not time», he says in an interview with Anna Tatarska. «The concept of time was imposed by the West, the Spanish» (Tatarska, 2013). In contrast to Western philosophy, however, Malay life was «founded on the patterns of nature; the meaning of existence is appropriated by nature’s way» (Picard, 2012). If six, seven or even nine hours running time appear excessive, this is still less than Diaz’s magnum opus; the eleven-hour long Evolution of a Filipino Family [Ebolusyon ng Isang Pamilyang Pilipino, 2004], an epic exploration of life under Martial Law, which was ten years in the making. Paolo Bertolin describes Diaz’s cinematic use of duration as as representation of “jam karet” or “rubber hour”. Jam karet is a specific perception and practice of time in the Malay peninsula. In using duration – both in form of long-takes and in form of the films’ lengths – Diaz puts on screen «the possibility and desirability of stretching time” based on a “pre-modern, rural space-temporal dimension» (Bertolin, 2007).

diaz - 5Evolution of a Filipino Family.

Diaz’s almost obsessive use of long duration is, perhaps, also grounded in the themes his films tackle. He tends to deal with the traumatic history of his country, marked by four hundred years of Western colonialism, followed not long after by President Ferdinand Marcos’ dictatorship, or “constitutional authoritarianism”, as he called it. The films’ use of duration are an expression of trauma, which is at the heart of Diaz’s cinematic oeuvre. His often repetitive return to the same historical traumas is, in fact, characteristic of post-trauma and can be seen not only in Diaz’s work but also in the characters he creates. He uses filmmaking in order to rid himself of the traumatic events he has endured primarily during Marcos’ Martial Law. As a teenager he witnessed atrocities committed against men, women and children. He, too, was beaten by the military.

«I’ve seen people breaking down, begging for their lives, losing their minds. I’ve experiences being hit with an armalite rifle’s butt and then hitting the ground, gasping for air. Our barrio was attacked and bombed by fighter planes and decimated bodies were flying all over. I saw Muslim bodies, young and old, pregnant women and babies, being piled up near a highway after a massacre, their houses turned to ashes in the background. I saw tortured and burned bodies of Christians after a massacre, their houses still burning in the background.» (Tioseco, 2006)

diaz - centuryCentury of Birthing [Siglo ng pagluluwal, 2011].

The violence had no end. Under Martial Law, Diaz was interned in a so-called hamlet, a form of concentration camp that was used to separate the local population from the NPA (New People’s Army) in order to starve off the latter and to observe the rebels’ movements. Entire villages were gathered into single buildings, such as schools. Diaz was forced into a hamlet with around 150 other families. It is hard to imagine just how it felt at the time. Curfews prevented the people from leaving the hamlet. Farmers were allowed to go to their farms only when guarded by the military. In Diaz’s own words:

«We were all put there. We just stayed there. The military [gave] you food. You’re like prisoners, for like how many months there? You cannot go to the farms. There’s a curfew. Basically if you get out of the school you get shot. It’s like a prison house. You’re free inside the schoolyard, but you cannot go out. It’s like a concentration camp also. … In a way it’s our concentration camp. It’s our own version of it.» (Diaz, 2014)

diaz - 6From What is Before [Mula sa kung ano ang noo, 2014].

Diaz lost relatives, who either died or went missing. If one was to look for a cinematic adaptation of all those traumas, it is Diaz’s six-hour film Florentina Hubaldo, CTE [id., 2012], which contains the repeated shifts, the, what he calls, “repeated banging”, the “chronic malady” of colonialism, oppression, political violence, dictatorship. Florentina stands in for the Philippine nation, ravaged and broken by history, struggling to remember history in order not to repeat it. It seems only natural that filmmaking has become a form of therapy for him in order to work through past events, allowing himself and his country to leave the circle of political violence. When I asked him about the relationship between his films and therapy, he replied:

«For one [sic], it’s a cleansing process, personally. And … the cleansing process adjusts to my culture, to my people. We need to confront all these things, all these traumas, all these unexamined parts of our history, of our struggle, so that [we] can move forward. It’s a kind of cure. … I always want to tell stories about these struggles. Personally, I want to cure myself of the trauma of my people.» (Diaz, 2014)

diaz - 7Florentina Hubaldo, CTE.

Diaz’s films are more than just films. They are healing devices, carried by Diaz’s loss of friends, who died after having joined the communist cause in Mindanao. He, on the other hand, walked his father’s way and tried to tackle the political situation with music. Film, he says, is a way to lessen his guilt for not having joined the armed fight.
Yet his films are more than a repeated dwelling on past events. What Diaz shows in his films is the dangerous nature of trauma; if suppressed and not worked through, the past seeps into and often wrecks havoc on the present. There is the aspect of disappearances in his eight-hour film Melancholia [id., 2008], a form of political terror which was widespread under Marcos’ dictatorship, but which didn’t end with it. On the contrary, disappearances are still very common, more than thirty years after Marcos’ brutal reign, which countered opposition with disappearances, extrajudicial killings and torture. Death in the Land of Encantos [Kagadanan Sa Banwaan Ning Mga Engkanto, 2007] is another example where the past seeps into the present, turning Hamin, a persecuted poet-artist and main character of the film, into a target for torture. And then there is what Diaz calls his “most accomplished film” (Diaz, 2014), Florentina. More than a metaphorical depiction of colonial oppression, it shows the ire situation of young women who are sold by their fathers as a result of stark poverty.

diaz - 8

diaz - 9Up, Melancholia; down, Death in the Land of Encantos.

Where can we position Diaz’s films? Past and present merge into one. The trauma of the past makes a healthy present almost impossible. Diaz’s characters are often paralysed without a chance to break through the prison of circular (post-traumatic) time. What remains is a dark shadow over contemporary Philippines where the son of Ferdinand Marcos is running for the position of vice president with a large support in the population. Across his oeuvre, Diaz attests his country that it has forgotten the past and is bound to repeat it. Memory alone can pave the way for healing, for a healthy progression into the future. Diaz is a memory keeper. His films keep the suppressed history of the country alive and has the potential to open people’s eyes. If only the films were shown in his native country.
But Diaz isn’t worried. «It will be seen soon», he says. «It will happen. One day it will happen. That’s why I still believe it can effect change. I have faith in cinema. It’s my fucking church.»

Nadin Mai, independent researcher.

theartsofslowcinema.com

 

Bibliography

Bertolin P. (2005 [2007]) (On) Time: Lav’s (R)Evolution. Available at: http://ulan-shiela.blogspot.co.uk/2007/12/ebolusyon-ng-isang-pamilyang-pilipino.html.

Diaz, L. (2014) Interviewed by Nadin Mai, Locarno Film Festival, Locarno, 10 August.

Diaz, L. (2015) Interviewed by Nadin Mai, Paris, 5 November.

Picard A. (2012) Film/Art | Beware of the Jollibee: A Correspondence with Lav Diaz. Available at: http://cinema-scope.com/columns/filmart-beware-jollibee-a-correspondence-lav-diaz/.

Tatarska A. (2013) Lav Diaz: Patiently Seeking Redemption. Available at: http://www.fandor.com/blog/lav-diaz-patiently-seeking-redemption.

Tioseco A. (2006) A Conversation with Lav Diaz – Ebolusyon ng Isang Pamilyang Pilipino. Available at: http://criticine.com/interview_article.php?id=21&pageid=1139146073.

Vera N. (2014) Hesus Rebolusyonaryo (Jesus the Revolutionary, Lav Diaz, 2002). Available at: http://criticafterdark.blogspot.co.uk/2014/10/hesus-rebolusyonaryo-jesus.html.

 

separatore

This essay is in English: please click HERE for the ENGLISH ORIGINAL VERSION.

Il filippino Lav Diaz, uno dei registi d’essai più prolifici di oggi, è conosciuto principalmente per la lunghezza dei suoi film, contraddistinti per il caratteristico bianco e nero e le tematiche “duplici”, che utilizzano immagini di sofferenza individuale come metafora di mali sociali più ampi – delle Filippine e del mondo. Dopo il grande successo alla Berlinale di quest’anno, dove ha vinto il premio Orso d’Argento Alfred Bauer, e con le incombenti elezioni presidenziali nelle Filippine – politicamente, il regista è sempre impegnato con tutti i suoi film – sembra dunque opportuno rivisitare la carriera di Diaz, che copre quasi due decenni.
Lav Diaz è nato il 30 dicembre 1958 in quella che oggi è Datu Paglas, sull’isola di Mindanao. Assieme ad altri insegnanti neolaureati, i suoi genitori si trasferirono, con i loro figli, dalle zone urbane di Manila a quelle aree rurali di Mindanao, dopo aver volontariamente deciso di istituire un sistema scolastico per le regioni più povere. Anche se gli anni ’50 e ’60 furono caratterizzati da violenti scontri tra cristiani e musulmani proprio in quelle zone, Diaz e la sua famiglia non ne rimasero direttamente coinvolti. Al contrario Diaz, nonostante l’assoluta povertà, descrive questo periodo come “felice e armonioso”. (Diaz, 2015). È stato lì che Diaz ha avuto modo di conoscere una serie di film provenienti da tutto il mondo, da quelli di kung-fu allo spaghetti western fino al melodramma filippino. Come egli stesso afferma, suo padre era «malato» di cinema, ed era solito portare i suoi figli a Tucarang ogni fine settimana per quattro doppi spettacoli. Anni dopo, durante il suo primo anno al college, Diaz vide Maynila, sa mea Kuko ng Liwanag [1975] di Lino Brocka, il film che avrebbe cambiato la sua vita. Quando gli chiesi il ruolo di questo film in una prospettiva più ampia nella sua carriera di regista, Diaz disse: «ho iniziato a notare quello che stava accadendo nel mio paese. Avevo già 17 anni. Così, quando ho visto questo film, ho pensato “Mio Dio, questo mezzo è così potente. Possiamo sfruttarlo per educare la nostra gente.”» (Diaz, 2015)

diaz - 1Maynila, sa mea Kuko ng Liwanag di Lino Brocka.

È stato l’inizio della carriera cinematografica di Diaz. Egli ha lavorato per alcuni anni nello studio cinematografico filippino Regal, facendo film prevalentemente commerciali dalle sfumature leggermente artistiche. A quel tempo, come tanti altri come lui, sentiva il bisogno di dover far parte del sistema, al fine di realizzare il suo sogno di diventare regista. Il suo film Naked under the Moon [Hubad sa Ilalim ng Buwan, 1999], per esempio, mostra la predilezione di Diaz per il long-take e il campo lungo al posto dei più comuni tagli veloci e primi piani. Ma lo studio decise che il film aveva bisogno di scene di sesso per attirare un maggior numero spettatori e aumentare il profitto al box office. Egli abbandonò il cinema commerciale quattro anni più tardi. Nei primi anni 2000, Diaz iniziò a seguire la vena artistica già visibile in Naked Under the Moon.

diaz - 2Naked under the Moon.

Questo nuovo, e ad oggi attuale, periodo è iniziato con la produzione di Batang West Side [West Side Avenue, 2001], ad oggi il film filippino più lungo (Vera, 2014). Da allora, i film di Diaz si sono fatti visivamente sempre più riconoscibili. Con l’eccezione infatti di Batang, la sua pellicola del 2002 Hesus, The Revolutionary [Hesus, Rebolusyunaryo], e Norte, The End of History [Norte, Hangganan ng Kasaysayan, 2013], presentato al Festival di Cannes, tutti i film successivi di Diaz sono contrassegnati da una scala di grigi e da un’aspra estetica in bianco e nero. Una caratteristica, questa, che si fa particolarmente intensa nel film di Diaz di sei ore Florentina Hubaldo, CTE (2012), molto simile al noir di Béla Tarr The Man from London [A londoni férfi, 2007]. Egli descrive il colore come «molto, molto ingannevole… Io voglio girare in bianco e nero per rendere giustizia a ciò che il film sta rappresentando. Come la povertà – che è migliore in bianco e nero. La sofferenza è meglio in bianco e nero. E, al di là della povertà e della sofferenza, per me il cinema è in bianco e nero» (Diaz, 2014). A parte la sua ossessione per il bianco e nero, della quale egli appare decisamente schietto, i film di Diaz si distinguono per il massiccio uso della camera fissa e dei campi lunghi, che mostrano vasti spazi naturali aperti in cui i personaggi appaiono spesso soltanto come dei punti. Egli considera infatti la natura al pari di un attore, concedendo ad essa lo stesso spazio sullo schermo degli altri suoi attori e attrici.

diaz - 3

diaz - 4Sopra, Batang West Side; sotto, Florentina Hubaldo, CTE.

Ciò che risalta però, in tutta l’opera di Diaz, è la sua attenzione assoluta per la durata. Pellicole di sei o sette ore non sono una rarità. Piuttosto, rappresentano la norma, e tutto ciò che è più breve è un’eccezione sorprendente. Le lunghezze dei questi film raffigurano la versione cinematografica del passato malese preispanico, quando il tempo nelle Filippine era stato considerato come “spaziale”. «Lo spazio è ancora la filosofia dominante [oggi], non il tempo», afferma Diaz in un colloquio con Anna Tatarska. «Il concetto di tempo è stato imposto dall’Occidente, dagli spagnoli» (Tatarska, 2013). In contrasto con la filosofia occidentale, tuttavia, la vita malese è stata «fondata sui modelli della natura; il senso dell’esistenza è imposta da modelli naturali» (Picard, 2012). Se sei, sette o anche nove ore di durata possono apparire eccessive, sono comunque meno della opus magnum di Diaz; le undici ore di Evolution of a Filipino Family [Ebolusyon ng Isang Pamilyang Pilipino, 2004] – un’epica esplorazione della vita sotto la legge marziale – sono infatti il risultato di dieci anni di lavoro. Paolo Bertolin descrive l’uso cinematografico, di Diaz, della durata come rappresentazione di una «jam karet» o «rubber hour». La jam karet è una percezione specifica del tempo nella penisola malese. Usando la durata – sia sotto forma di long-take che di lunghezze dei film – Diaz mette sullo schermo «la possibilità e l’opportunità di allungamento del tempo» sulla base di una «pre-moderna e rurale dimensione spazio-temporale». (Bertolin, 2007).

diaz - 5Evolution of a Filipino Family.

L’uso quasi ossessivo della lunga durata per Diaz è motivato, forse, anche dai temi che i suoi film affrontano. Egli è incline ad occuparsi della storia traumatica del proprio paese, segnata da quattrocento anni di colonialismo occidentale, e seguito successivamente dalla dittatura del presidente Ferdinand Marcos – o “autoritarismo costituzionale”, come lui stesso lo definiva. L’utilizzo della lunga durata nei film sono l’espressione di un trauma che è al centro dell’opera cinematografica di Diaz. Il ritorno ciclico agli stessi traumi storici è, infatti, caratteristica del post-trauma e può essere ravvisato non esclusivamente nel lavoro di Diaz, ma anche nei suoi personaggi. Egli utilizza il cinema per liberarsi degli eventi traumatici che ha dovuto sopportare durante la “legge marziale” di Marcos. Da adolescente, infatti, ha assistito alle atrocità commesse nei confronti di altri uomini, donne e bambini. Lui stesso è stato picchiato dai militari.

«Ho visto persone abbattute, imploranti per la loro vita, perdere il proprio senno. Ho vissuto l’esperienza d’essere colpiti con il calcio del fucile e poi cadere la terra, senza fiato. Il nostro quartiere è stato attaccato e bombardato dagli aerei da combattimento e i corpi straziati venivano scaraventati ovunque. Ho visto i corpi dei musulmani, di giovani e vecchi, di donne incinte e neonati, venir accatastati vicino alla strada dopo un massacro; le loro case trasformate in cenere. Ho visto i corpi dei cristiani torturati e bruciati; le loro case bruciano ancora.» (Tioseco, 2006)

diaz - centuryCentury of Birthing [Siglo ng pagluluwal, 2011].

La violenza non ha avuto fine. Sotto la legge marziale, Diaz è stato internato in una cosiddetta “frazione”, una sorta di campo di concentramento utilizzato per separare la popolazione locale dall’NPA (Nuovo Esercito del Popolo), al fine di respingere questi ultimi e di osservare i movimenti dei ribelli. Interi villaggi sono stati raccolti in singoli edifici, come ad esempio le scuole. Diaz è stato costretto a trasferirsi in una “frazione” con circa altre 150 famiglie. È difficile immaginare cosa provasse in quel periodo. Il coprifuoco impediva alla gente di lasciare il villaggio. Gli agricoltori erano autorizzati ad andare alle loro fattorie solo sotto la sorveglianza dai militari. O, come nelle parole di Diaz:

«Siamo stati messi tutti lì. Dovevamo stare lì. I militari ti danno da mangiare. Sei come un prigioniero… ma per quanti mesi? Non puoi andare alle fattorie. C’è il coprifuoco. Se venivi trovato fuori della scuola ti fucilavano. È come una prigione. All’interno della scuola sei libero, ma non si può andare fuori. È come un campo di concentramento… In un certo senso, è il nostro campo di concentramento. È la nostra versione.» (Diaz, 2014)

diaz - 6From What is Before [Mula sa kung ano ang noo, 2014].

Diaz ha perso molti parenti, di cui alcuni sono morti o scomparsi. Se esiste un possibile adattamento cinematografico di questi traumi, probabilmente si tratta del suo film di sei ore, Florentina Hubaldo, CTE [id., 2012], che contiene i cambiamenti ripetuti, ovvero ciò che egli chiama «repeated banging», la “malattia cronica “del colonialismo, dell’oppressione, della violenza politica, della dittatura. Florentina rappresenta la nazione filippina, devastata e spezzata dalla storia, mentre cerca di ricordare la propria storia per non ripeterla. Sembra dunque naturale che il cinema sia diventato per lui una forma di terapia, concentrandosi sugli eventi passati, e permettendo così a se stesso e al suo paese di fuoriuscire dal cerchio della violenza politica. Quando gli domandai a proposito del rapporto tra i suoi film e la terapia, Diaz rispose:

«Per qualcuno [sic], è un processo di purificazione, personalmente. E… il processo di purificazione si adatta alla mia cultura, alla mia gente. Abbiamo bisogno di affrontare tutte queste cose, tutti questi traumi, tutte queste parti inosservate della nostra storia, della nostra lotta, in modo che [noi] possiamo essere in grado di andare avanti. È una sorta di cura… Ho sempre voglia di raccontare storie di queste lotte. Personalmente, voglio curarmi del trauma del mio popolo.» (Diaz, 2014)

diaz - 7Florentina Hubaldo, CTE.

I film di Diaz sono più che dei semplici film. Sono metodi di cura, portati dalla perdita degli amici di Diaz, morti dopo aver aderito alla causa comunista a Mindanao. Lui, d’altra parte, ha percorso la strada di suo padre e ha cercato di affrontare la situazione politica con la musica. Girare film, dice, è un modo per diminuire la sua colpa per non aver aderito alla lotta armata.
Eppure, i suoi film sono più di una ripetuta dimora degli eventi passati. Cosa mostra Diaz nei suoi film è la natura pericolosa del trauma; se soppresso e non elaborato, il passato penetra e fa a pezzi il presente. C’è l’espressione delle sparizioni nel suo film di otto ore Melancholia [id., 2008], una forma di terrore politico, diffusa sotto la dittatura di Marcos, ma che purtroppo non si è conclusa con esso. Al contrario, le sparizioni sono ancora molto comuni, dopo più di trent’anni dal brutale regno di Marcos, il quale ha neutralizzato l’opposizione con sparizioni, uccisioni extragiudiziali e torture. Death in the Land of Encantos [Kagadanan Sa Banwaan Ning Mga Engkanto, 2007] è un altro esempio di come il passato si insinua nel presente, trasformando il perseguitato poeta-artista Hamin, il personaggio principale del film, in un bersaglio per la tortura. E poi c’è quello che Diaz stesso definisce il suo «film più compiuto» (Diaz, 2014), Florentina. Più di una rappresentazione metaforica di oppressione coloniale, il film mostra l’irosa situazione di giovani donne, vendute dai loro padri a causa della forte povertà.

diaz - 8

diaz - 9Sopra, Melancholia; sotto, Death in the Land of Encantos.

Dove possiamo collocare i film di Diaz? Passato e presente si fondono in un’unica cosa. Il trauma del passato rende impossibile un presente sano. I personaggi di Diaz sono spesso paralizzati, privi della possibilità di rompere la prigione di un tempo ciclico (post-traumatico). Ciò che resta è un’ombra oscura sulle Filippine di oggi, dove il figlio di Ferdinand Marcos è in corsa per la carica di vice-presidente con il supporto nella popolazione. In tutta la sua opera, Diaz attesta che il suo paese ha dimenticato il proprio passato ed è destinato a ripeterla. Solo la memoria può aprire la strada per una guarigione, per una sana progressione verso il futuro. Diaz è un custode della memoria. I suoi film mantengono viva la storia soppressa del proprio paese vivo e hanno il potenziale per aprire gli occhi della gente. Se soltanto i film fossero mostrati nel suo paese natale.
Ma Diaz non è preoccupato. «Si vedrà presto», dice. «Succederà. Un giorno accadrà. Ecco perché io continuo a credere che si possa ottenere un cambiamento. Ho fiducia nel cinema. È la mia cazzo di chiesa».

Nadin Mai, independent researcher.

theartsofslowcinema.com

RIFERIMENTI BIBLIOGRAFICI

Bertolin P. (2005 [2007]) (On) Time: Lav’s (R)Evolution. Available at: http://ulan-shiela.blogspot.co.uk/2007/12/ebolusyon-ng-isang-pamilyang-pilipino.html.

Diaz, L. (2014) Interviewed by Nadin Mai, Locarno Film Festival, Locarno, 10 August.

Diaz, L. (2015) Interviewed by Nadin Mai, Paris, 5 November.

Picard A. (2012) Film/Art | Beware of the Jollibee: A Correspondence with Lav Diaz. Available at: http://cinema-scope.com/columns/filmart-beware-jollibee-a-correspondence-lav-diaz/.

Tatarska A. (2013) Lav Diaz: Patiently Seeking Redemption. Available at: http://www.fandor.com/blog/lav-diaz-patiently-seeking-redemption.

Tioseco A. (2006) A Conversation with Lav Diaz – Ebolusyon ng Isang Pamilyang Pilipino. Available at: http://criticine.com/interview_article.php?id=21&pageid=1139146073.

Vera N. (2014) Hesus Rebolusyonaryo (Jesus the Revolutionary, Lav Diaz, 2002). Available at: http://criticafterdark.blogspot.co.uk/2014/10/hesus-rebolusyonaryo-jesus.html.